Parallel sessions and poster sessions

During the conference there are paper presentations, dynamic flash presentations, inspirational talks, symposia and workshops to choose from, spread over seven parallel sessions:

 

  • Paper presentation: presentation of 20 minutes followed by 10 minutes questions/discussion. Two or three paper presentations are grouped together around a theme in one session.
  • Poster presentation: posters presenting research results and case studies will be available to be viewed at all times during the conference. Next to that the presenters will be available at there posters in parallel sessions 2 and 5.
  • Symposium: a group of three or four papers submitted around one theme.
    • 3 x 20 minutes presentation and 30 minutes discussion
    • 4 x 15 minutes presentation and 30 minutes discussion
  • Workshop: informative interactive sessions of 90 minutes in which the participants are engaged in demonstrations, hands-on activities and/or discussion, based on research or practices.
  • Dynamic flash presentation: presentation by young/starting researchers of 10 minutes followed by 20 minutes discussion.
  • Inspirational talk: TED-like talk with the intention to inspire the audience, for example by storytelling and/or sharing future perspectives. Exactly 18 minutes presentation without questions/discussion. Four talks are grouped together in one session.

How to use the schedule

The session rounds are shown by clicking on the day. By clicking on one of them you can browse through all sessions in this particular block. When you click on a specific session, the abstract text will unfold. By clicking on the session again, the text will fold.

 

Search

Use the search field at the top to find sessions containing the filled out word, theme, name or abstract number. Submitting the type of presentation (e.g. workshop or paper presentation) will show all sessions of the requested type.

 

Select

You can select sessions of your interest by clicking on the star in the left upper corner. The star will turn yellow. You can see all your selected favourites by checking the ‘Show My Picks’ button at the right upper corner of the schedule heading. To view all sessions again, simply click on the ‘Show/Hide All’ button.

 

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Sessions schedule

 

Thursday 1 September 2022

10:45 - 12:15 Parallel Sessions 1

Understanding Twice Exceptional Learners: Connecting Research to Practice

Workshop44Wendy Behrens, Minnesota Department of Education, United States; Eleonoor Van Gerven, SlimEducation! NF, Almere, Netherlands; Claire Hugher, College of Coastal Georgia, Brunswick, United States; Susan Baum, Bridges Academy, United States

AfricaThu 10:45 - 12:15

Balanced research and practice

Gifted students with disabilities, known as twice exceptional or twice-exceptional learners are at-risk when their instructional, and social and emotional needs are not supported. These co-occurring conditions occur in an estimated one third of the gifted learner population. This session looks at the lived experiences of gifted learners who are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, ADHD, Executive Functioning Disorder, or are Dyslexic. Unlike other sessions focused on these populations of students, our project provides an examination of co-occurring disabilities commonly found in twice-exceptional populations. Presenters will introduce the concept of twice-exceptionality then focus on Autism Spectrum Disorders, Attention Deficit Disorder, Executive Functioning, and Dyslexia. The vignettes that follow the literature review highlight the lived experiences of twice-exceptional students, and the behaviors that practitioners may see at home and in their classrooms will be shared.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Innovative educational practices, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PRACTITIONERS, strategies, strengthbased, Twice exceptional, vignettes

Learn about and experience a holistic change perspective on (the network) of gifted students/dropouts

Workshop301Akke Tick, Time2Tick, Netherlands; Sophie Louwersheimer, Time2Tick, KORTGENE, Netherlands

AntarcticaThu 10:45 - 12:15

Practice based

Dropouts and their surroundings often feel desperate. They feel like they have an inadequate skill set to manage the complex learning situation of the youngsters. In this workshop, based on qualitative research in the Netherlands and personal contacts with (the network of) gifted students/dropouts, Akke Tick (ECHA specialist in gifted education and change/communication specialist) and Sophie Louwersheimer (gifted working student in public administration and ambassador of the Erasmus School of Social and Behavioral Sciences) present a creative way of supporting these youngsters and empowering their network, focussing on togetherness. This workshop includes current practices and ideas for future improvement and change based on the Prosci/ADKAR model and communication strategies. You leave with food for thought, concrete action steps in your own cases and inspiration on connecting with yourself, your network and (the network of) students/dropouts. It stimulates new traditions in working with (the network of) gifted students/ dropouts.

Creating New Traditions, Creativity without limits, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _TEACHERS, Change management, Communication, Gifted dropouts, Network governance

Impact of Activities in Gifted Education (IMAGE) in the Netherlands

Paper presentation255Marjolijn van Weerdenburg, Radboud University, Netherlands

AsiaThu 10:45 - 12:15

Scientific

The project 'Impact of Activities in Gifted Education' (IMAGE) aims at enhancing knowledge about improving education for gifted students by measuring the impact of the (funded) activities nationwide in the Netherlands. A first inventory study revealed many different types of activities to be conducted in primary and secondary education to improve inclusive education for gifted students. Five studies will investigate the impact of the combinations of these activities on (1) student development, (2) educational services, (3) expertise development, and (4) collaboration. The focus will be on effective working mechanisms (What works?) and conditions (Why?).

_RESEARCHERS, educational activities, inclusive education, measuring impact

Gifted education: from the study of the social representations and attitudes of peers to the definition of didactic intervention

Paper presentation273Stefania Pinnelli, Università del salento, Italy

AsiaThu 10:45 - 12:15

Practice based

In recent years, in the field of education, there has been a growing interest in the issue of giftedness and related awareness-raising actions that can be implemented in the school context. Pedagogical research recognizes perceptions and representations about giftedness as a fundamental role: an activator of attitudes and behaviours. In the reference literature, students’ representations of giftedness are marginally explored. In view of the importance of broadening these investigations, this contribution focuses on the peer group, the main social reference, exploring the representational repertory on giftedness in the early school age. This analysis follows a brief intervention of awareness and promotion of a correct and inclusive representation of the giftedness and ends with a reflection aimed at leading students to the knowledge of the gifted peer beyond myths and misconceptions, promoting an influence of enriching and pervasive reciprocity in the whole educational community.

Pupil’s voice, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_TEACHERS, education, giftedness, Inclusion, peer group

Gifted students at school. From the observation of potential to Classroom-based strategies.

Paper presentation275Stefania Pinnelli, Università del salento, Italy

AsiaThu 10:45 - 12:15

Balanced research and practice

The structural framework of Renzulli’s schoolwide model (SEM, Renzulli and Reis, 1985; 1997) involves the entire school organization and all its protagonists in strengthening the gifted pupil. SEM is designed to achieve three objectives: 1. develop talents in all students; 2. provide a wide range of enrichment experiences; 3. Provide meaningful learning experiences. Starting from the observation of the characteristics of a gifted student, this study presents the specific and differentiated enrichment activity for a primary school in the subject of Math based on the Anderson and Krathwohl Taxonomy (2001). The description of the activity is part of the Italian version of the Renzulli scale, which provides specific guidelines for teachers that want to support gifted students at school in a mainstream and inclusive context after their identification.

Innovative educational practices
_TEACHERS, Enrichment, Inclusion, Primary School

Talent-Targeted Teaching and Learning: A Model for Motivating and Engaging Every Learner

Workshop56Jeanne Paynter, Educating Innovators, United States

Central AmericaThu 10:45 - 12:15

Balanced research and practice

Talent-Targeted Teaching and Learning is a comprehensive model that applies the psychology of motivation, engagement, and achievement in practical tools that educators can use to focus learning on long range goals for “educating innovators.” Using this approach, teachers create talent goals and learning experiences that explicitly target the “the seven aptitudes of innovators:” curiosity, logical reasoning, creativity, insight, persistence, metacognition, and leadership. In addition, talent goals can target domain-specific aptitudes in STEM and the humanities, such as problem solving, spatial reasoning, and communication. Participants will engage in the five components of the Talent-Targeted Teaching and Learning model: (1) Create a talent development mindset; (2) Develop talent-targeted goals and performances of understanding; (3) Teach the talents using problem-based studies; (4) Assess the talent goals using developmental rubrics; (5) Reflect using protocols embedded within the Talent Development Portfolio. Examples of Talent-Targeted Lessons and Unit Plans will be shared (grades 4 – 8).

Engaging Every Learner: Motivation & Flow, Innovative educational practices, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PRACTITIONERS, creative teaching, innovation, student engagement, talent development

Children thrive when freed from their parents’ dreams

Workshop70Britta Weinbrandt, Arts & Change Coaching Britta Weinbrandt, Germany

Europe 1Thu 10:45 - 12:15

Practice based

Every child should have the right to be who they are.Into this workshop I bring my expertise as a failure mother. I was surprised to find out that the major key to helping them was to find a place of self acceptance and self compassion first.As Playing Artist, Dream Ambassador and Arts & Change Coach, I dream of spreading the word that there is inner work to do. We are able to reflect and deal with our own childhood issues.There are innovative ways in creative dreamplay, lucid writing and active imagination to change perception and decode our own individual dream symbols, representations and limiting belief systems. We can use this to learn to trust in our children’s good futures and free them, our spouses and the children’s caregivers and teachers from our dreams, projections and wishes, so they all can unwrap their own potential and be themselves.

Innovative educational practices
_PARENTS, Coaching the parents, Dreaming a better future for children, Family and Environment, Parent guidance

Two Gifted Centers & One Moon: while earth is threatened, life on the moon turns out to be an option.

Workshop318Efrat Bengio, Beit Berl College, Israel; Adva Margaliot, Kibbutzim College of Education, Tel Aviv, Israel; Ksenija Benaković, Wind in your back gifted center, Croatia

Europe 2Thu 10:45 - 12:15

Practice based

In this workshop we will apply the actions according to which educators can prepare and run an international project that explores the moon as a living environment, in which the students build a biosphere. This workshop exposes the aspects that need to be considered while promoting such international projects for gifted children.

Creativity without limits, Pupil’s voice
_POLICY MAKERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, Creativity & mediation, International Collaboration

A journey into the mindsets of teachers on a treasure hunt

Dynamic flash presentation147Franziska Proskawetz Proskawetz, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Germany

Everest 1Thu 10:45 - 12:15

Scientific

We use some terms constantly, synonymously, almost inflationarily, without questioning their meaning. Talent, aptitude and giftedness are such terms. Am I talented if I can make myself a terrific sandwich every day when I'm still in elementary school, despite having very little pocket money? Are only those gifted who get straight A's and B's on their report cards? Especially when it comes to awarding scholarships, the assessment of personal abilities, potentials - talents - seems to play an important role. What do teachers use as a guide when recommending students for scholarship programs, and what mindset leads them to decide who is talented and eligible for a recommendation?

_RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Disadvantaged Background, Scholarship, Talent, Teachers

A philosophical approach to talent development: the why?

Paper presentation162Anne Van de Vijver, University of Antwerp , Belgium

Everest 1Thu 10:45 - 12:15

Scientific

The talent development literature has varying views on the ultimate goals for talent development, such as achieving eminence, contributing to societal challenges, and individual happiness. Clarity on the ultimate goals of talent development is highly relevant, as they guide how talent development should be designed. To date, however, there has been no systematic research into the very fundamental question of why talents should be developed. This article therefore examines whether and how talents should be developed from the perspective of three ethical schools: virtue ethics (Aristotle), duty ethics (Kant), and utilitarianism (John Stuart Mill). From these ethical foundations, this article then derives practical guidelines that the design of talent development should meet.

Innovative educational practices
_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Ethics, Moral development

Giftedness as a Cluster Concept – a Dynamic Model for Policy, Research and Practice

Paper presentation187Caroline Sims, Uppsala University; University of Gavle, Sweden

Everest 1Thu 10:45 - 12:15

Balanced research and practice

In research, it is common to define giftedness in terms of necessary and sufficient conditions – a ‘classical definition’ (Andersen 2002). In practice, such definitions are problematic because they are either too narrow, too wide, and involve an arbitrary cut-off. In two research reviews covering a total of 135 articles, the majority based their samples on IQ or high performance. In the whole review no less than 70 criteria for giftedness were identified.An alternative strategy is to treat giftedness as a cluster concept consisting of ten loosely connected categories. Empirical applications of this conceptualisation are presented covering both policy documents and teaching practices (Ball 1993). Establishing a new tradition through the use of a dynamic model of this kind has the potential to impact policy, research, and practice offering a way to include students who are gifted but not necessarily high achieving on standardised testing or IQ measures.

Creating New Traditions
_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, Cluster concept, Definition, Identification, Policy

Easing the Transition: Helping Profoundly Gifted Students Make the Leap into Online Learning

Paper presentation64Jessica Potts, Davidson Academy Online, Czech Republic

Everest 2Thu 10:45 - 12:15

Balanced research and practice

The transition from brick-and-mortar environments into online learning can be difficult for students. Not only do they have to contend with new technology, but the distance between users can be challenging. Online learning is a topic of interest in gifted education, as virtual learning platforms can provide students with appropriate levels of rigor and pacing. While gifted students benefit from the flexibility of online learning, they must still contend with the challenges of transitioning into virtual environments. These challenges can be compounded when students are also transitioning into gifted education. This study aims at understanding the transition period for gifted students entering a fully virtual learning environment specifically designed for their intellectual, social, and emotional needs. The research was conducted as a phenomenological multiple case study, with the goal of understanding how stakeholders can help students navigate the double transition of moving into both online and gifted education.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Innovative educational practices, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_TEACHERS, online learning, phenomenological case study, profoundly gifted students, transition to online and gifted learning

Teaching foreign languages to highly able students

Paper presentation86Alberta Novello, University of Padua, Italy

Everest 2Thu 10:45 - 12:15

Balanced research and practice

The presentation aims to inform on the best strategies to teach foreign languages to highly able students on the basis of a research conducted among 210 language teachers and 35 gifted students. Also, the cognitive processes implied in speaking a foreign language have been analysed and then compared to the main cognitive features of talented students in order to identify the most suitable activities to develop language acquisition. The main characteristics in language learning observed in highly able students will be presented as well as the appropriate classroom activities related to each feature. Some examples of inclusive lessons plans for the language classroom will also be given.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Innovative educational practices
_TEACHERS, communicative abilities, educational linguistics, language learning, language teaching

Best practices to support and empower gifted LGBTQ students

Paper presentation175Orla Dunne, Centre for Talented Youth, Ireland

Everest 2Thu 10:45 - 12:15

Practice based

This presentation will offer a combined research and practitioner perspective on how to build a positive climate for gifted LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer) students. This presentation will offer an overview of the topic, discuss the challenges facing gifted LGBTQ students and offer practical advice to educators on how to support this population. Qualitative data from an ongoing research study on the experiences of gifted LGBTQ students attending a gifted summer programme will also be discussed.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, LGBTQ

The Pandemic Generation: Talent Development Implications

Inspirational talk181Claire Hughes, College of Coastal Georgia, United States

MississippiThu 10:45 - 12:15

Practice based

Every generation begins with a bang- a defining moment that marks the end of a period of time. “Where were you when….?” Most theorists mark generations in 20- or 25-year increments because of significant changes in economic, political and social factors. Generational norms follow a bell curve where the differences between generations are less clear at the tail ends and are very clear by the middle. The pandemic marks the end of Generation Z. This session will examine sociological, media, and marketing approaches that explore the trends, the mindsets, and the “vibe” of each generation and how these differences impact school leadership, curriculum, and areas of talent development. Implications for teaching students who are at the end of Generation Z and beginning this new Pandemic Generation will be collaboratively drawn and participants will leave with strategies and ideas for developing the talents of this new generation.

_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Gen Z, Generations

Gifted Students at University

Inspirational talk235Simone Keijsers, Leiden University, Netherlands

MississippiThu 10:45 - 12:15

Balanced research and practice

The aim of my research and work is to discover what challenges connected to giftedness university students encounter when starting and continuing their studies. Challenges in academic and other skills, in their needs and in social interaction.Based on my research and on conversations with many gifted students I developed group sessions and individual counselling. The purpose of the counselling is that gifted students can develop skills and methods to deal with these (and other) challenges. I also create opportunities for them to meet each other.

Giftedness across the Lifespan
_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Challenges, Gifted, Support, University students

Using stories in coaching neurodiverse/ twice exceptional people to reframe perspective and succeed in life

Inspirational talk300Jaana Rasmussen, Rasmussen Consulting, Germany

MississippiThu 10:45 - 12:15

Balanced research and practice

Inspirational talk

I learned about giftedness through my son. He rebelled at elementary school, and after a tough journey he finished school with Abitur (A-levels) at the age of 16. As he did not fit in, I had to give up my career to support him. I joined the DGhK, qualified as an ECHA Coach and invested two years of lobbying. The outcome was that a group of parents succeded in changing schools in Hamburg- since 2016, support for gifted and talented pupils is mandatory. (see ECHA magazine 2016).

Aims

Encouragement to use storytelling for change and as a method to reframe and engage people

Description of the talk

Without my son acting like he did at school and without the power of storytelling, change would not have happened. In the talk I will share our story of collective impact and how storytelling can be used in coaching and campaigning.

Summary

1. My background story

2. How storytelling works the brain

3. How strategic storytelling can be used to change perspective and engage people to act diffenrently

4. Why stories and reframing are successful in coaching gifted and talented/ 2E/ neurodiverse people

5. What I learned personally on the journey

6. How my career path has changed through the challenges I met along the way

_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Coaching, Neurodiversity, Storytelling

Walking A Mile In Johan Cruyff’s Shoes

Inspirational talk309Johan de Deugd , Bonaventura College , Netherlands

MississippiThu 10:45 - 12:15

Balanced research and practice

Johan Cruyff received virtually infinite praise towards the end of his life. It was said that he, singlehandedly, both renewed and professionalized football. He was also considered to be the driving force behind many successes of Ajax, Barcelona, and both national teams of The Netherlands and Spain. However, during his lifetime, not all commentaries were that positive, leading to the grand question of what it means to be more talented or gifted than most of those around you.

Giftedness across the Lifespan
_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Difficulties of giftedness, Johan Cruyff, Meaning of giftedness

Enhancing Mawhiba’s Research Programs An Investigative Analysis to Recommend Future Program Implementations

Paper presentation260Nada Alqahtani, King Abdulaziz & his Companions Foundation for Giftedness & Creativity (Mawhiba), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Khalid Alsharif, King Abdulaziz & his Companions Foundation for Giftedness & Creativity (Mawhiba), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Mark Oleksak, King Abdulaziz & his Companions Foundation for Giftedness & Creativity (Mawhiba), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Sondos Alwahieb, King Abdulaziz & his Companions Foundation for Giftedness & Creativity (Mawhiba), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

North AmericaThu 10:45 - 12:15

Practice based

The purpose of this report is to review the current research programs and evaluate them in relation to the recognized high-quality international programs. The procedures for this report are threefold; First, a literature review was accomplished to ensure that all global publications in this field were read and analyzed. Second, a survey of 43 past students that participated in the associated ventures was conducted that focused on their assessment of the program and how it supported them in their future endeavors. Third, a thorough review was undertaken of all existing programs in the world. From this evaluation, key recommendations were delivered in three main facets: Preparation, Program Implementation, and Personal Sustainability. With the realization of these recommendations, there is a high degree of potential to have a new cadre of leaders, that have both commensurate content knowledge and competitive intrapersonal skills.

The purpose of this report is to review the current research programs and evaluate them in relation to the recognized high-quality international programs. From this evaluation, key recommendations were delivered in three main facets: Preparation, Program Implementation, and Personal Sustainability. With the realization of these recommendations, there is a high degree of potential to have a new cadre of leaders, that have both commensurate content knowledge and competitive intrapersonal skills.

_PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, Personal Sustainability, Preparation, Program Implementation, Research

Psychosocial functioning of high-ability youth: Insights from the Talent-project

Symposium141Jeroen Lavrijsen, KU Leuven, Belgium; Alicia Ramos, KU Leuven, Belgium; Sofie Hendrix, KU Leuven, Belgium

OceaniaThu 10:45 - 12:15

Scientific

Intellectual giftedness is often assumed to be a risk factor for psychosocial maladjustment. However, empirical research has not unequivocally supported this assumption. In this symposium we aim to further our understanding of the psychosocial functioning of high-ability youth by (a) examining different aspects of psychosocial functioning (i.e., mental health, self-concept, peer relationships), and (b) paying attention to differences within the high-ability group. As psychosocial factors have been argued to play a key role in talent development (Subotnik et al., 2011), these insights may help support the realization of personal and societal potential.

Chair: Karine Verschueren (KU Leuven)Discussant: Rena Subotnik (APA) (pending acceptance of the symposium she submitted to the ECHA-conference)

The papers in this symposium use samples recruited from two large-scale longitudinal studies within the TALENT project (N = 5,740 and 3,409 students, respectively). Cognitive ability was tested through standardized cognitive tests. As the high-ability students were not preselected, positive or negative bias was prevented. The first paper addresses differences between high- and average-ability youth on mental health outcomes, such as internalizing problems and maladaptive perfectionism. Also, it investigates which parental practices are related with increased risks for maladaptive perfectionism. The second paper examines math self-concept development in the transition from primary to secondary school and investigates the long-term educational outcomes of math self-concept declines, comparing high- with average-ability students. The third paper investigates differences in peer-related loneliness among high-ability youth and how they relate to individual (e.g., personality, level of intelligence) and social contextual predictors (e.g., number of friendships). The fourth paper uses a multi-method approach and focuses on affinity for solitude among high-ability students, exploring differences in motivation and its implications for psychosocial well-being. An expert on giftedness and talent development will reflect on these findings and their implications for gifted education and talent development programs.

Presentation 1: Intellectual giftedness and mental health: findings from a large community sample of adolescents
Jeroen Lavrijsen (KU Leuven) and Karine Verschueren (KU Leuven)
Whereas intellectual giftedness is often assumed to increase risks of psychological maladjustment, research does not seem to support such an association (Francis, Hawes, & Abbott, 2016). In this study, we present results from a large scale study in a Flemish community sample of 3,409 7th grade students (49.6% boys, Mage = 12.5 years). A range of mental health outcomes (maladaptive perfectionism, externalizing and internalizing problem behavior, fear of failure) were surveyed, both with self- and parent-reports. Students were defined as cognitively gifted if they scored among the top 10% of a representative age group on a cognitive ability test (CoVaT-CHC) (IQ ≥ 120; n = 403). These students were compared to a reference group consisting of average ability students (IQ between 90 and 110). Overall, high ability students did not report more mental health problems than their peers; if any, differences were in favor of the high ability group. However, students who had been formally identified as gifted (i.e., who received a gifted label) did report worse adjustment for a number of outcomes. Finally, for one outcome (i.e., maladaptive perfectionism), parental antecedents were investigated, finding that maladaptive perfectionism was positively associated with parental practices such as criticism, excessive expectations, and conditional regard.

Presentation 2: Development of Math Self-Concept in the Transition to Secondary Education among High-Ability and Average-Ability Students
Alicia Ramos (KU Leuven) and Karine Verschueren (KU Leuven) Math self-concept, or a person’s subjective evaluation of his or her math abilities, is an important predictor of math achievement and selection of math-based study options and careers. Because high-ability students are uniquely positioned to achieve highly in math and pursue societally valuable STEM careers, understanding potential challenges in their math self-concept development is an important step in maximizing their personal and societal potential.This study aimed to better understand the development of math self-concept among high-ability students during the secondary school transition, a vulnerable period marked by fluctuations in self-perceptions, as well as implications of this development. It compared this development with that of average-ability students in a largescale longitudinal sample in Flanders, Belgium (N=5,740 students, 49.5% males). Latent change models revealed that high-ability students experienced steeper decline in math self-concept during the transition to secondary school than their average-ability peers. In both groups steeper math self-concept decline was associated with higher levels of later underachievement, lower achievement and school well-being, and higher probability of grade repetition. These findings establish that decline in math self-concept can have negative implications for longer-term educational outcomes, even when math self-concept level remains high relative to peers such as is the case for high-ability students.

Presentation 3: Heterogeneity in Loneliness Experiences of High-Ability Students: Individual and Social Context Predictors
Nina Steenberghs (KU Leuven), Jeroen Lavrijsen (KU Leuven), Luc Goossens (KU Leuven) and Karine Verschueren (KU Leuven)Loneliness is a common problem among early adolescents who are at a crossroad in their social development. It is often claimed that loneliness would be especially relevant for high-ability students because they would experience more difficulty in socializing with their peers. Research on this issue has yielded mixed results. This study examined the diversity in feelings of loneliness of cognitively gifted students. Individual differences (intelligence level, giftedness label, personality) and differences in the social context (social preference, victimization, friendship quantity) of adolescents were considered as predictors of loneliness. Additionally, gender differences in these relations were investigated. The sample consisted of 403 students from the TALENT sample, belonging to the top 10% of their age group in terms of cognitive capabilities (Mage = 12.4 years, 50.3% males). Variables were measured longitudinally across four waves in two consecutive school years using self-report and peer nominations. Multilevel growth curve analysis revealed that all predictors except giftedness label predicted loneliness over time. Gender differences were found for effects of social preference and victimization. These findings indicate that intellectual giftedness as such is not a risk factor for loneliness, but rather that there are circumstances within which high-ability students are more likely to be lonely.

Symposium paper 4

Presentation 4: Affinity for solitude in high-ability adolescents: motivations underlying time spent alone and its impact on psychosocial well-being
Sofie Hendrix (KU Leuven), Jeroen Lavrijsen (KU Leuven) and Karine Verschueren (KU Leuven)Affinity for solitude is often associated with maladaptive psychosocial outcomes. However, this may vary depending on whether spending time alone is motivated by positive or reactive factors. Previous research showed that high-ability adults experience a greater need for being alone. To date, affinity for solitude and underlying motivations have not yet been examined in cognitively gifted adolescents. To address these gaps, the present study examines (a) the motivations for affinity with solitude among cognitively gifted adolescents and (b) if these motivations moderate the relation of affinity with solitude with psychosocial wellbeing. Participants are 270 high-ability adolescents (Mage= 16,25 years) from the TALENT sample. Several indices of psychosocial wellbeing were gathered, along with affinity for solitude and qualitative self-reports of underlying motivations. First findings will be presented at the ECHA conference. By examining the influence of motivation for solitude on the relationship between affinity for solitude and psychosocial well-being, we hope to gain a better understanding of the implications of being alone and which groups of high-ability students are at greater risk for psychosocial difficulties.

_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, Mental health, Peer relationships, Psychosocial functioning, Selfconcept

Understanding the Gifted Portion of the iGeneration (Generation Z): Trends, Theories, and Treatment

Workshop62Paul Beljan, Beljan Psychological Services, United States

Oceania FoyerThu 10:45 - 12:15

Practice based

This session will provide insight into the iGeneration as it pertains to the commonalities of the gifted population. Generation Z is the predominant generation of our elementary and high school students. Their behavioral norms vary from those of the Millennial generation. Learn about trends, problems, mental health issues, addictions, communication norms, and meeting the needs of students of each generation. Special attention will be paid to specific gifted norms (asynchronous development, etc.) as they pertain to perspectives of the iGeneration as well as the science of technology addiction. Learn what you can do as teachers, practitioners, and parents to positively impact the lives of these children and to help them navigate a world that requires skills beyond those we needed as school age children.

Giftedness across the Lifespan, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PRACTITIONERS, generation z, iGeneration, Mental health, technology

Learners with High Ability in Marginalized and Disadvantaged Contexts. (Research and Application)

Symposium261David Rempel, IU International University of Applied Sciences, Erlangen, Germany; Lineke van Tricht , Bureau Talent Leiden, Leiden, Netherlands; Lianne Hoogeveen, Radboud University, Netherlands; Catherine Reid, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom; Margaret Sutherland, University of Glasgow, United Kindom; Ian Warwick, London Gifted and Talented, United Kingdom; Ndondo Mutua, Mully Children's Family, Kenya

Yangtze 1Thu 10:45 - 12:15

Balanced research and practice

The symposium will explore findings and application for learners with High Ability dealing with issues of disadvangtage and marginalisation in four different contexts.The first Paper focuses on the use of formal academic langauge (or lack thereof) and the impact on testing results. An effective academic language programme, specifically targeting able disadvantaged students has been developed and is analysed. The second paper builds on the research of the above and is applied in a Dutch context. The project contributed to bridging the gap between these students’ cognitive talent and their current academic achievement.The third paper analysis how highly able learners from areas of high deprivation in Scotland adjust to, assert and maintain their position in the educational field. The fourth paper is case study of the impact of NGO STEMM Promotion Program in Kenya. The development, design, outcomes and impact of the program is analysed and explored.

The symposium will explore findings and application for learners with High Ability dealing with issues of disadvangtage, marginalisation and adjustment in four different contexts. The first Paper focuses on the impact of knowledge of use / or lack of formal academic langauge and the impact on testing results based on years of research. We know that students from more challenged communities tend to perform poorly in formal test environments, compared to their more privileged peers. Our focus, for many years, has been to investigate why. We have found that such learners often slip into a more informal tone for a task when what is required is the adoption of formal language. They may also have good topic level knowledge but a more limited capacity to show what they know when answering in exams. We have developed an effective academic language programme, specifically targeting able disadvantaged students who may have excellent ‘spoken’ language which is not mirrored in their ability to use formal language and genre.

The second paper builds on the research of the above and is applied in a Dutch context. The project ‘Creating equal opportunities at school: Empowering students from less advantaged backgrounds through teaching academic language’, co-financed by Erasmus+, contributed to bridging the gap between these students’ cognitive talent and their current academic achievement.

The third paper analysis how highly able learners from areas of high deprivation in Scotland adjust to, assert and maintain their position in the educational field. Widening Participation to higher education is frequently articulated in terms social mobility, however, these students are often understood as arriving with a deficit of academic and social skills. Higher Education can offer new and rich opportunities for intellectual growth and development for these young scholarsThe fourth paper is case study of the impact of Mully Children’s Family STEMM Promotion Program in Kenya. Mully Children’s Family has evolved as a centre with deliberate programs geared towards promoting and developing gifts and talents among children from marginalised and poverty-stricken communities. Nurturing children’s giftedness with the potential to excel in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine (STEMM) related fields has been a key priority area of focus. The development, design, outcomes and impact of the program is analysed and explored.

Innovative educational practices
_PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, impact of language on perception, lowsocioeconomic talent development, marginalized gifted, widening participation of gifted

Empowering Gifted Students in STEM: An Experience Using Online Mentoring in Abu Dhabi, UAE

Workshop258Ahmed Mohamed, United Arab Emirates University, United Arab Emirates

Yangtze 2Thu 10:45 - 12:15

Practice based

The purpose of this workshop is to present an online mentoring program initiative for gifted high school students in Abu Dhabi. The program serves as a driving force to enhance enrichment programs. Phase 1 included dividing gifted students into interest groups. Three enrichment clusters comprised this phase, namely, STEM cluster, young researcher cluster, and book club cluster. In Phase 2, students and teachers received extensive training relating to problem solving skills in a collaboration with a team of experts and researchers in the USA. Prior to the end of phase 2, students were asked to write proposals (research/business proposals) that can be implemented in phase 3 to address the problems and issues raised in phase 2 and which were related to reducing plastic waste. The workshop presents several examples of students’ innovations and offers excellent opportunities for exchanging ideas/experiences in relation to the workshop topic with the audience.

_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, gifted high school, online mentoring, STEM

14:15 - 15:15 Parallel Sessions 2 and Poster Sessions

Life Outcomes of Gifted Adolescents After Radical Acceleration

Dynamic flash presentation149Rachel C Lin-Yang, University of British Columbia, Canada

AsiaThu 14:15 - 15:15

Scientific

Profoundly gifted adolescents living in Vancouver, Canada have the unique opportunity to attend a radical acceleration program called the University Transition Program (UTP). Completing traditionally five-year high school programs in two years, these radical accelerands begin their undergraduate studies at the University of British Columbia at 14-15 years old. Using a retrospective survey questionnaire, this study aims to answer the questions: What are radical accelerands’ experiences of and retrospective reflections on radical acceleration? How has radical acceleration impacted these accelerands’ life outcomes? By examining the academic, professional, and socioemotional outcomes of these gifted accelerands, the use of radical acceleration as an educational intervention can be evaluated. Alumni (n=250) were invited to participate in a retrospective survey which inquired into their experiences with radical acceleration. Possible gender differences in life outcomes will be explored and common themes of radical acceleration will be analyzed through the qualitative data.

Giftedness across the Lifespan, Innovative educational practices, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, Acceleration, Achievement, Selfregulation, Socioemotional development

Unlocking Potential: Finding the Keys to Student Success in a University Early Entrance Academy

Paper presentation218Susan Assouline, The University of Iowa, United States

AsiaThu 14:15 - 15:15

Balanced research and practice

Academic talent cannot be developed in the absence of academic challenge or psychosocial support; academic acceleration has proven its robustness in both areas. There are more than 20 forms of academic acceleration, including whole-grade acceleration, which can involve entering a college or university at much younger ages. The cohort model is deemed essential to both the academic and psychosocial success of accelerated students. Although we have documentation of accelerated students’ academic success (i.e., graduating earlier than peers and continuing to pursue higher degrees), little research has been conducted to assess students’ perceptions of their overall well-being and happiness. In this presentation, we consider key components of the cohort model designed to support students’ overall well-being. Results of a study that addressed students’ overall experience with the program revealed that the program positively influenced their academic success as well as their overall happiness with respect to their family and friendships.

_PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, Acceleration, Happiness, Wellbeing

Qualitative and Quantitative Comparison of Instructional Practices and Learning Outcomes in Math Classes of Young Gifted English Learners

Paper presentation179Jenny Yang, St. John's University, United States; Sonmi Jo, St. John's University, Queens, United States; Seokhee Cho, St. John's University, Queens, United States

Central AmericaThu 14:15 - 15:15

Balanced research and practice

Purpose of the study was to examine relationship between instructional strategies and student achievement of young gifted English learners in kindergarten. Intervention teachers were trained on how to use interactive and supportive scaffolding approach, whereas comparison teachers did not attend the training. Math open response assessment showed intervention students’ growth in mathematical reasoning significantly higher than comparison students. Classroom discourse analyses revealed that spiral Initiation-Response-Feedback (IRF) was more displayed in the intervention classes, whereas comparison classes displayed more of closed IRF. Further analyses of discourse between teachers and students revealed the followings: Intervention students exhibited more in-depth mathematical reasoning, visual-spatial abilities, and independent problem-solving skills on an open-ended geometry assessment than comparison students. The findings support the view that by integrating content and language scaffold into instruction delivery, teachers can support gifted ELs more effectively in their development of subject expertise, metacognition, and socio-emotional skills.

_PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, English Learner, Math Achievement, Scaffold, StudentTeacher Interaction

Gifted & teacher-friendly strategies

Paper presentation320Rima Jay Prakash, Departamento de Línguas, Culturas e Literaturas Modernas, Portugal

Central AmericaThu 14:15 - 15:15

Balanced research and practice

It is vital to consider how those at the forefront can be supported with ideas and strategies that are beneficial for their gifted and talented learners and have shown to raise the standards for all children. The aim of this paper is to bridge the gap between research-based practices in gifted education as examined in the literature review and research pertaining to current gifted friendly practices of secondary teachers of EFL in Portugal. What is happening and what does best practice literature suggest should be done?Both quantitative and qualitative data allowed for the analysis of strategies being used by 110 schoolteachers of English. Classroom observations and semi-structured interviews also helped shed light on counterproductive practices taking place and misconceptions teachers harbour.To help lessen the achievement gap between what is currently happening within classrooms and what needs to happen, a comprehensive synthesis of gifted and teacher-friendly strategies is presented.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_TEACHERS, Curricular modifications, differentiation, English as a Foreign language

Stipendium Peregrinum Scholarship Programme – Hungary’s public investment in the future

Paper presentation63Gergely Gosztonyi, National Talent Center, Hungary

Europe 1Thu 14:15 - 15:15

Practice based

Instead of the brain-drain that characterises the Western world, Hungary’s Stipendium Peregrinum Scholarship Programme is one of the first in the world to achieve a kind of reverse brain-drain: young Hungarians acquire knowledge abroad at the world’s most prestigious higher education institutions and use it later within nation’s borders when they return. The fully state funded programme enables young people with outstanding talent to develop their skills in an optimal environment and to gain access to world-class knowledge. The article explains how the programme was developed, how it functions in its third year and what could be the experience that could be used by other countries world-wide.

Creativity without limits, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_POLICY MAKERS, Hungary, state funded

Tutor program - a nationwide Hungarian mentor program

Paper presentation322Hajnalka Morvai, -, Hungary; Csilla Fuszek, European Talent Centre - Budapest, Hungary

Europe 1Thu 14:15 - 15:15

Practice based

The purpose of the paper presentation is to show the structure and experience of the Hungarian national mentor program (called the “Tutor Program”). The first phase of the best practice developed by the staff of the Hungarian Talent Centre (MATEHETSZ) lasted from 2016 to 2021, with the participation of 2743 students. The target group consisted of talented students aged 10-18 for whom school-based talent support or the talent support options available in their direct environment proved to be insufficient.The mentor provided talent management to the youth admitted to the program based on the recommendation of teachers. One “door-opener” mentor was dealing with 8-10 youth. The mentor mapped the networks and talent support options around the mentee, helped them specify and realise their individual learning paths adjusted to public education and managed their activities connected to their abilities.

Supporting talent development & personal growth
_POLICY MAKERS, _TEACHERS, individual learning path, mentoring, network

The Role of Ethnic identity related to their school attitudes, self-concept, and academic achievement

Poster presentation21aMihyeon Kim, -, United States

Meeting PlazaThu 14:15 - 15:15

Balanced research and practice

Both social identity theory and developmental theory indicate that a stronger or more committed ethnic identity would be associated positively with psychological well-being, academic achievement, academic attainment, and psychological well-being (Herrington, 2014; Roberts, etc., 1999). This session examines associations of students’ ethnicity, general self-concept, attitudes in schools, and their academic performance. Also, this session introduce key components of a residential summer program for low-income, high-ability middle school students, designed to foster understanding about themselves and capabilities for their professional career future. Educators may be able to play an important role in enhancing positive psychological strength of disadvantaged students, thereby setting the trajectory for students’ continued success in academics. Implications from the results of the study and the focus of the program planning components to serve disadvantaged students will be discussed.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_PRACTITIONERS, academic performance, ethnic identity, school attitudes

Leading Through Crisis: Gifted Coordinators' Pandemic Experiences

Poster presentation106aKeri Guilbault, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, United States

Meeting PlazaThu 14:15 - 15:15

Balanced research and practice

ObjectivesThe purpose of this study was to explore the leadership experiences of district advanced academic coordinators during the COVID-19 pandemic. We investigated challenges, opportunities, and leadership traits of central office administrators who oversee K-12 advanced learning programs in the United States.Theoretical FrameworkWe utilized Bandura’s (1977) self-efficacy theoretical framework to examine individual level traits. We also utilized the meta-leader framework by Marcus et al (2019) that describes leadership during a crisis and the roles of self-concept and emotional intelligence.

_PRACTITIONERS, _TEACHERS, COVID19 pandemic, gifted coordinators, leadership

Gifted students in risk situations – narratives and support

Poster presentation111aTamara Malešević, National Education Institute Slovenia, Slovenia

Meeting PlazaThu 14:15 - 15:15

This qualitative study is based on a small number of Slovenian students answering two open-ended questions: What are the possible reasons gifted teenage students underachieve or even leave school earlier, and: What could be good ways of adult (parents, teachers) support for this not to happen?We reopen the question about the reasons for ESL and underachievement from the student's point of view and search for additional interventions to prevent that. We try to establish whether we could confirm previous findings about these reasons: problems with self-esteem, unconscious guilt, motivation and self-regulation, mindset, personality traits, mental health, etc. Secondly, we explore young people's narratives or experiences for alternative adult interventions to prevent these unwanted outcomes, particularly focusing on career guidance leading to good career decisions of gifted students and developing self-regulation skills.

_PARENTS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Early school leaving, Gifted teenager, Underachieving

Accelerating Development Through Mensa Youth International

Poster presentation112aKeri Guilbault, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, United States

Meeting PlazaThu 14:15 - 15:15

Background: Mensa Youth International is a cooperative community of world wide representatives that inspires development and shares resources through motivational campaigns and online access to proven coordinated events.

The PurposeTo educate readers on the importance of extra support for gifted youth.Methods: Our methods for engaging gifted youth educators and helping to develop gifted young minds range from our very active enrollment in speaker series events, an expanding resource repository and notable localized campaigns such as Mensa Grammar School in Prague and European Mensa Juniors Camp in Germany. Results: Our two primary methods of encouraging active growth and participation are our popular speaker series and our online database of resources.Conclusion: Mensa International gives gifted youth around the world access to the same social and educational opportunities through a network of shared approaches to developing gifted young minds.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_PARENTS, _TEACHERS

The Duran Model: a New Psychological View on Giftedness

Poster presentation129aYvonne Duran, Praktijk Hoogbegaafd, Netherlands

Meeting PlazaThu 14:15 - 15:15

Balanced research and practice

After years of scientific research, we know that gifted individuals struggle to fit in with their environment. Feeling different and experiencing a ‘mismatch’ with the world they live in, can greatly impact their mental wellbeing. In our earlier version of the Model of Duran and other popular models about giftedness there has been a focus on framing, ‘what is giftedness’? In our new model, we added the most important factors concerning the wellbeing of gifted individuals and how they interact. The main objective for this model is to give practitioners, teachers and parents insight in important personal and contextual aspects that impact the wellbeing of gifted individuals. Assessing which factors are causing and exacerbating the problems gifted individuals are experiencing, gives the practitioner tools to tailor therapy to the need of the individual. Assessing which aspects can serve as protective factors could motivate and strengthen an individual to accomplish change.

_PARENTS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _TEACHERS, influencing factors, Model, Wellbeing

Mentoring as a tool to promote talented youth in STEM areas, closing the gap for women: Delphi study in Mexico

Poster presentation170aMaritza Salcido, Friedrich-Alexander University in Nuremberg, Germany

Meeting PlazaThu 14:15 - 15:15

Balanced research and practice

Developing countries like Mexico need to provide educational tools to promote talented youth, however, not much is known about Mexican practitioner’s and researchers evaluation of those tools. This poster will assess the importance of the mentioned tools for Mexican practitioners by differentiating between three aspects 1) if mentoring is considered the best tool for the inclusion of young people in the labor market 2) if this tool is considered one of the most challenging and finally 3) if this type of educational resources is considered less accessible to women. By analyzing the ranking of preference for programs in talent development, we can explore experts opinions about different types interventions (Enrichment, Mentoring Pull-Out or Other Specialized Programs, Grouping or other). These findings will serve as a starting point for understanding the acceptance of mentoring as a tool to enhance talent development in Mexico.

Innovative educational practices
_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, mentoring, Mexico, talent development, Women in STEM

The Role of Teacher-Student Relationships in Engagement and Achievement Trajectories among High- and Average-Ability Students.

Poster presentation210aEline Camerman, KU Leuven, Belgium

Meeting PlazaThu 14:15 - 15:15

Scientific

School engagement has been considered key for students’ socio-emotional functioning and academic achievement. In the present study, we aimed to examine whether supportive or conflicted teacher-student relationships influence engagement trajectories, and whether, through their contribution to academic engagement trajectories, teacher-student relationships indirectly shape achievement trajectories of high- and average-ability students. To this end, we draw on data from the longitudinal TALENT-study in Flanders in which students were followed throughout grades 7 and 8. By considering the role of teacher-student relationships in high- and average-ability students’ engagement and achievement trajectories, the present examination sheds light on the potential of promoting positive teacher-student relationships as a means of enhancing both high- and average-ability students’ academic engagement and achievement. First findings will be presented at the ECHA conference.

Engaging Every Learner: Motivation & Flow
_RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, Achievement, Engagement, Teacherstudent relationships

Learning Capital and Educational Capital in Mexican Children and Adolescents with High Intellectual Capacities

Poster presentation242aMaría de los Dolores Valadez, University of Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico

Meeting PlazaThu 14:15 - 15:15

Scientific

El Modelo Actiotópico de la Superdotación bajo un enfoque sistémico permite reconocer el desarrollo del talento a través del resultado de la autoorganización y la adaptación de un sistema altamente complejo. El objetivo de este estudio fue comparar los puntajes promedio de estudiantes con alta capacidad y sin alta capacidad en Capitales Educativos y de Aprendizaje. Método. Participaron 146 alumnos con alta capacidad intelectual y sin alta capacidad que cursaron de 4º a 3º básico. secundaria Se extrajo una muestra equipada. El instrumento utilizado fue el Cuestionario de Capitales Educativos y de Aprendizaje Mx (validado en población mexicana). Se realizó una prueba t de Student. Los resultados indican que los estudiantes con altas capacidades tienen capitales educativos y de aprendizaje más altos en comparación con la población normativa.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_POLICY MAKERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, High Capacity, Mexican, Model Actiotope, students

An English, Dutch and Ukrainian conversation sheet to talk about well-being - let us show you!

Poster presentation290aNora Steenbergen-Penterman, SLO, Netherlands institute for curriculum development, Netherlands; Hanna Beuling, SLO, Netherlands institute for curriculum development, Amersfoort, Netherlands; Marloes Warnar, SLO, Netherlands institute for curriculum development, Amersfoort, Netherlands

Meeting PlazaThu 14:15 - 15:15

Balanced research and practice

In the Netherlands, there are many regional and national collaborative alliances aimed at meeting the educational needs of gifted students. Despite this, a relatively large percentage of school dropouts are gifted. Schools requested a practical tool for supporting the well-being of gifted youth.Studying relevant literature, we framed well-being as a combination of biological, social, and psychological factors. We formulated definitions for three aspects of well-being, namely emotional, social, and physical well-being. Furthermore, we summarised the main conclusions of current research on giftedness and well-being.In deciding on our approach to support schools and experts in supporting gifted students, we conducted a field study into current practices. Additionally, we consulted many experts and gifted students while developing our English, Dutch an Ukrainian conversation sheets.Does your heart go out for the well-being of gifted students? Are you looking for practical tools? Join our poster presentation!

_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, emotional, physical, social

Reading ability and self perception in primary school students in Greece

Poster presentation317aPenny Panagiotopoulou, University of Patras, Greece

Meeting PlazaThu 14:15 - 15:15

Scientific

The present study aims to investigate reading ability and self-perception in students of 1st, 2nd and 3rd Grade. Reading ability correlates positively with self-perception getting stronger by age. The sample comprised 206 students of 1st, 2nd and 3rd Grades of public and private school. Reading ability was measured by psychometric tools standardized with primary school students in Greece. Reading comprehension, was measured by Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children Fifth Edition» or «Wisc-V» and self-perception was measured by “Self-perception scale for children I” (Makri-Botsari, 2001). Word decoding and self-perception peers’ relationships are statistically significant positively correlated and both differed by gender, type of school and parents’ educational level. In addition, multiple regression showed that gender and type of school affect the depended variables the most, in a no statistically significant way. The findings are discussed in the framework of literature and finding regarding reading and personal growth.

_PSYCHOLOGISTS, reading ability, selfesteem, selfperception

A Trifecta Partnership that’s Empowering Israel's Science Teams

Poster presentation324aShira Hirsh, Future Scientist Center, Israel

Meeting PlazaThu 14:15 - 15:15

Practice based

In the last few years, Israel has become a leader in the international high-tech industry. This achievement is likely the result of progress in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields studies, among the younger generation.In this presentation, we would like to demonstrate a unique collaboration between philanthropy, government, and academy that fosters the enrichment of national programs for gifted and talented children.

Engaging Every Learner: Motivation & Flow
_PRACTITIONERS, competition, olympiad, STEM

Referrals, Identification Appeals, and Outside Testing can Only Hurt Equity in Gifted Education

Paper presentation194Scott Peters, University of Wisconsin - Whitewater, United States

North AmericaThu 14:15 - 15:15

Balanced research and practice

Districts often include parental referrals, outside testing, and provisions for appeals in their gifted and talented identification policies. Unfortunately, all of these policies can only exacerbate racial / ethnic and socioeconomic inequity in identified gifted populations. This session will identify why this is the case before offering alternatives as well as ideas for how to communicate policy changes to stakeholders.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_PRACTITIONERS, Appeal, Equity, Identification, Referral

Strategy to Optimally Identify Students for Gifted Services

Paper presentation195Scott Peters, University of Wisconsin - Whitewater, United States; Lindsay Lee, East Tennessee State University, United States; Kiana Johnson, East Tennessee State University, United States

North AmericaThu 14:15 - 15:15

Balanced research and practice

The identification of students for gifted programs is often a balancing act of accuracy and cost. Administering identification assessments to all students misses the fewest students, but requires the most time and money. To limit costs, some districts put relatively few students through the identification process, resulting in missed students, often those from traditionally disadvantaged groups. There are ways to increase system accuracy without increasing cost. This paper presents one such method, called Optimal Identification, that leverages existing, universally-administered assessments to create a two-phase identification system that retains the sensitivity of universal consideration systems, but at a fraction of the cost. This procedure has applications and implications for any programs that base admission on non-universally administered criteria.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Innovative educational practices
_PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, Cost, Equity, Identification

Biography, Eminence, and Personal Growth in the Curriculum

Paper presentation154Ann Robinson, University of Arkansas, United States

OceaniaThu 14:15 - 15:15

Balanced research and practice

Biography has been used in the curriculum for high ability students to teach the content domains of literacy and history and to foster personal growth and engagement. High ability youth who experience an intense identification with their talent area benefit from exploring the lives of eminent artists, engineers, mathematicians, musicians, scientists, and writers. The aim of this session is to focus on innovative curricular teaching guides developed through a federal research and demonstration project which can be used with children and emerging adolescents in school and out-of-school settings. The effectiveness of the biographical curricular intervention with teachers and students, examples from a biography scope and sequence document which guides the project, and a new classroom assessment, BIOS, will be shared. Biography enriches classroom practice and inspires high ability students to explore the development of their talents through life stories of eminence across cultural contexts.

Creativity without limits, Innovative educational practices
_PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, Assessment, Biography, Curriculum, Eminence

Creative Ways to Enable Youth Growth in Transcarpathia Region

Paper presentation163Natália Váradi, “GENIUS” Charity Foundation, Ukraine

OceaniaThu 14:15 - 15:15

Practice based

The essential condition of the economic evolution of a region is the assistance of young researchers, finding the young talents, supporting their development as well as finding those young people with outstanding achievements and with appropriate knowledge. Thus concerning this reason “GENIUS” Charity Foundation has been established in 2011. It carries out a wide range of talent management, talent development among the schoolchildren, students and young researchers.Our Foundation gives opportunity for gifted students to participate in extracurricular activities outside of school in different science fields, sport, music, arts, drama.The presentation would give a description of used best practice, methods, achievements in talent development of this region: competitions, other extracurricular activities in different scientific area, and also folk music, theatricals, acting circle, sport and many other.

Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PARENTS, _PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, best practice, gifted education, talent identification, talent pathway

Discovering Potential: How teacher education and providing learning opportunities helps underserved students

Paper presentation143Antonia (Toni) Szymanski, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, United States

Yangtze 1Thu 14:15 - 15:15

Balanced research and practice

This mixed-methods study sought to understand how coupling teacher education with research-based instructional interventions could influence underrepresented students participation in advanced mathematics coursework in a single school district. Results of this study show that teachers need professional development and that the amount and quality of the education makes a difference in their attitudes towards typically underrepresented gifted learners, their comfort with using research-based practices for gifted learners in their classroom, and their identification of underrepresented students for advanced mathematics classes. Students identified four themes in interviews and demonstrated significant mathematics growth during the project. The study further demonstrates how students with mathematics potential can thrive when given the opportunity and evidenced-based support.

Supporting talent development & personal growth
_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, classroom teaching, gifted education, mathematics

Global Principles for Professional Learning in Gifted Education

Paper presentation321Julia Link Roberts, Western Kentucky University, United States; Eleonoor van Gerven, Slim Educatief, Netherlands; Tyler Clark, Western Kentucky University, United States

Yangtze 1Thu 14:15 - 15:15

Practice based

Professional learning for educators can take various forms, including preservice university education, conferences hosted by professional associations, in-service workshops, etc. However, many educators are not provided opportunities to learn how to specifically serve their gifted students. To better understand how professional learning can occur to benefit gifted students, the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children appointed a committee of more than 20 members around the world to develop ten overarching principles that can be used across various contexts and cultures. This presentation will share the history of the committee’s work, the ten principles, and examples of how the principles can be realized in offerings for educators.

_PRACTITIONERS, Professional learning

15:45 - 17:15 Parallel Sessions 3

Understanding and assessing constructs of mathematical creativity in educational settings

Workshop89Jyoti Sharma, University of Delhi, India; Marcia. A.B. Delcourt, Western Connecticut State University, United States

AfricaThu 15:45 - 17:15

Balanced research and practice

Creativity is a developmental attribute of human cognition and an important characteristic of gifted behaviour. Mathematics as a discipline of inquiry provides a suitable platform to develop creativity. The proposed workshop intends to help participants understand the constructs of mathematical creativity and how to assess creativity using two instruments: Mathematics Creativity Questionnaire (MCQ) (Delcourt & Sharma, 2021) and Mathematics Creativity Test (MCT) (Sharma, 2021). Participants will be given experience of using both the instruments. MCQ consists of questions based on nature of mathematics and creativity. MCT consists of test items using pictures, contexts and problem solving to assess the creativity on five parameters: novelty, fluency, flexibility, mathematical appropriateness and mathematical coherence. The responses are scored on a rating scale and descriptive analysis is done to locate creative potentials in different subdomains. Both instruments are field tested and results are analysed using appropriate statistics.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _TEACHERS, creative ability, mathematical creativity, mathematical thinking

Making Education Gifted

Workshop10Minka Dumont , Begaafd Onderwijs, Netherlands

AntarcticaThu 15:45 - 17:15

Practice based

We are tweaking the educational system to make it a better fit for our children with gifted characteristics. But when we look at the gifted programs, it is easy to conclude that all children would benefit tremendously from what these programs have to offer.

It is time for a shift. Instead of adjusting educational practices to fit the needs of gifted children, why not make our education ‘gifted’ for ALL children? Based in decades of experience in teaching gifted children, this workshop provides primary school teachers with a hands-on, practical approach to get this shift going… Let’s make education gifted!

_TEACHERS, Future proof, Solution Fluency, Thinking skills

Every Child an Innovator: Teach and Assess the Seven Aptitudes of Innovators

Paper presentation60Jeanne Paynter, Educating Innovators, United States

AsiaThu 15:45 - 17:15

Balanced research and practice

Research on innovation reveals that there are seven cognitive and psychosocial aptitudes that undergird high achievement across disciplines. What if you could create instructional goals to teach the “aptitudes of innovators,” such as curiosity, creativity, insight, metacognition, or persistence, while still addressing the curriculum content? What if all learners had an explicit, shared understanding of what these aptitudes look like when expressed in their learning and in real life? This session presents an equitable process for creating talent-targeted goals to identify and nurture the aptitudes of innovators in all children. These talent goals are rooted in rich content and applied in performances of understanding that promote talent development and personal growth. Both teachers and learners assess the talent goals using the talent aptitude learning progressions to create developmental rubrics. Examples of talent goals, assessment rubrics, and planning templates will be shared.

Creativity without limits
_PRACTITIONERS, creative curriculum, innovation

How to Create Innovative School Student Engineering Projects

Paper presentation65Dieter Hausamann, DLR - German Aerospace Center, Germany

AsiaThu 15:45 - 17:15

Practice based

Innovative research projects are especially suited for supporting talents by bringing them into close contact with state-of-the-art research and development in the area of MINT (Mathematics, Informatics, Natural Sciences, Technology). A stimulating project with clearly defined objective groups of gifted school students can raise their limits of previous knowledge. By means of self-structured team action they are enabled to conduct targeted research and develop a defined innovative result. This paper presents practical examples of aerospace-related school student research projects, including their basic conception, organizational conditions, and the essential aspects of planning and implementation. The importance of creativity as well as the supporting and stimulating key role of teachers is emphasized.

Creativity without limits
_PRACTITIONERS, _TEACHERS, aerospace research, innovation, MINT talent support, teacher education

Empower Every Learner with a Talent Development Mindset

Paper presentation78Jeanne Paynter, Educating Innovators, United States

AsiaThu 15:45 - 17:15

Balanced research and practice

Which of our students have the potential to become tomorrow’s innovators, those creative problem solvers who will find unique solutions that enhance our lives? A talent development mindset believes that all of them may. This session presents strategies for identifying and nurturing talent in three phases: (1) Uncover misconceptions and “reseed” attitudes about talent; (2) Pre-assess students’ talent aptitudes, target talents in instructional goals, and systematically capture observations; and (3) Use the language of talent development in daily instruction and communication with families. Students are empowered with shared understandings about the aptitudes needed to become tomorrow’s innovators, today. In these ways, a talent development mindset undergirds and naturally fosters a growth mindset. Tools that will be shared include a talent aptitude survey, “aptitudes of innovators” definitions and student-directed goals, sample talent instructional goals and formative assessments.

Creativity without limits, Engaging Every Learner: Motivation & Flow
_PRACTITIONERS, Equity, Flow, Growth Mindset

An overview of new developments concerning the ECHA training in (and possibly outside) Europe

Symposium316Enikö Orsolya Bereczki, Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary; Christian Fischer, University of Münster, Germany; Mariska Poelman, Radboud University, Netherlands; Ulrike Kempter, Pädagogische Hochschule Oberösterreich, Austria

Central AmericaThu 15:45 - 17:15

Balanced research and practice

A major aim of the European Council for High Ability (ECHA) is to act as a communication network to promote the exchange of information among people interested in high ability – educators, researchers, psychologists, parents and the highly able themselves. ECHA also aims to enhance the study and development of potential excellence in people.One of the ways to reach this aim is training people to become ECHA-Specialists in Gifted Education. Making educators aware of the potentials and problems of highly able students often changes the school climate and helps to overcome possible prejudices against high ability.

In every ECHA conference to date, we have presented an update on ECHA training, which is offered in several European countries: the Netherlands, Germany, Austria and Hungary. Two years in a row of Covid-19 situation now has forced many trainers to switch to remote teaching, a challenge that has also to be met and discussed during the symposium. Thus the Educational Board of ECHA would warmly welcome more countries to join the group of ECHA Specialists in Europe and abroad!

Presentation 1: Technology-based gifted education: The development of a course to promote gifted education teachers’ technological pedagogical content knowledge

While much emphasis has been placed on technology-based teaching and learning for general education, the role of technology to support the needs of students with gifts and talents have received less attention up until recent years. Students with high abilities have differentiated needs, and research on the effectiveness of technology-based gifted education interventions and services show promising results. In order to prepare teachers to leverage the potential of technology in gifted education, we have designed a blended professional development course focusing specifically on improving in-service teachers’ technological pedagogical content knowledge in the area of gifted education at Eötvös Loránd University’s Institute of Education.This presentation will provide an overview of this course and its initial evaluation. Our presentation will help other higher education institutions and professional development providers to design CPDs for practitioners by which they can acquire the necessary knowledge and skills for technology integration in gifted programming.Keywords: technology-based gifted education, course development, blended learning, professional development

Presentation 2: ECHA-Teacher Training in Germany: Current challenges and Further Developments in the 21st Century

The International Center for the Study of Giftedness at the University of Münster has been offering ECHA trainings for teachers in Germany since 2001 in cooperation with the Center for the Study of Giftedness at the University of Nijmegen. Since then, more than 600 teachers in Germany have received the European Advanced Diploma for teaching gifted and talented children adequately including a special focus on gifted minorities and twice exceptional children. These `Specialists in Gifted Education and Talent Development´ play an important role in sustainably improving gifted education and talent support, innovating school development addressing diversity, equity and inclusion. The ECHA Training focusses on theoretical, diagnostic, didactic and communicative competencies in gifted education and talent development combined with innovation and implementation competencies in school development. The current challenges of globalization underline the necessity for further development of the ECHA training with an increasing focus on digitally supported personalized learning in addition to education for sustainability. Thus the ECHA training intends to contribute to a future-oriented promotion of giftedness and sustainable development of talents in the 21st century in line with the vision and goals of the European Council for High Ability (ECHA).Keywords: sustainable gifted education, implementation of gifted education, school development, digitally supported learning

Presentation 3: ECHA Specialists in Gifted Education make a difference

Who are the gifted students and what defines them? What are the different ways in which their needs can be served? How do you know if the gifted programme for your students is of high quality? How can you influence policy in gifted education in your country?

At the Radboud International High Ability Training Programme (RITHA), it is our goal to increase the knowledge and experience of those who identify, educate and counsel gifted students in primary, secondary and higher education all over the world. We believe that well-trained professionals can make a valuable contribution to improved education for all students, including those who are most talented.

The Radboud International Training on High Ability (RITHA) is a postgraduate, research based training programme that offers the opportunity to become an ECHA Specialist in Gifted Education.

Twenty-five years after the start of the first ECHA training in Nijmegen, the blended form of this same training (RITHA) started for the first time in 2017. Students from Croatia, Malta, The Netherlands, Portugal, and Hong Kong are now joining this new ECHA training.Keywords: influence on policy, identification, counselling, postgraduate training, international trainees, blended learning.

Presentation 4: Clever together: School Quality Management with the help of ECHA Specialists

The ECHA training programme in Austria is offered to graduated educators from kindergarden to university level and members of the educational staff working in regional policy.This programme has successfully been implemented in most federal states and comprises 3 types of training offers, varying in duration, complexity and graduation: a practitioner course (15 ECTS), an advanced programme (30 ECTS) and a Master programme (90 ECTS), the formats ranging from lectures to workshops and blended learning.The training itself provides profound knowledge of educational and psychological diagnostics, neurobiology, motivational psychology, diversity management as well as effective practice of learning environments and teaching strategies for gifted, well and highly gifted students, not only in regular classroom settings, but beyond, in an atmosphere of trust, esteem and care. Moreover school quality management has become an important focus of the training especially on the Master`s level as policy makers and representatives of schoolboards are realizing that ECHA trained teachers are making a difference in learning for all the students.For further improvement of the training that has gained high acceptance among teachers we are trying to integrate a group of highly underestimated learners, apprentices with their mainly practical intelligence.Keywords: ECHA training programme in Austria, school quality management, vocational training, practical intelligence

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _TEACHERS, ECHA Specialist in Gifted Education, Educational Board, Teacher Training, Training Programs in Different European Countries

Helping parents cope - Innovative and creative methods of coaching

Workshop37Britta Weinbrandt, Arts & Change Coaching Britta Weinbrandt, Germany

Europe 1Thu 15:45 - 17:15

Practice based

When parents of high learning potential children seek for guidance, they often find themselves in a desperate situation.

Before parents are able to offer a suitable support, what they need is the feeling of self-efficacy and hope. They need to be able to see their childrens‘ futures in the brightest colouring possible.

Art Analogue Coaching offers a different perspective. It is based in systemic thinking and acting, which means that it is resource-oriented and „not knowing“, not founded upon a priori knowledge. Just as an artist creates his work, so an art analogue coach shapes the process of coaching.

Creativity is supposed to be the most important tool of this century. We can use it to help parents see their children as they are, and support them accordingly.

This workshop presents art oriented methods, that help parents develop a growth mindset.

Innovative educational practices, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PRACTITIONERS, Art Analogue Coaching, Family and social environment, Innovative Change Processes, Supporting Parents

Working with the “Overlooked” Gifted – (gifted but not High Achieving)

Workshop216David Rempel, IU International University of Applied Sciences, Erlangen, Germany; Catalina Backhoff, IU International University of Applied Sciences, Erlangen, Germany

Europe 2Thu 15:45 - 17:15

Balanced research and practice

Research shows misunderstandings are the core of most of the arising conflicts for the gifted, throughout the lifespan. These are typically caused by a difficult self-perception, as well as differences in preferences, habits, and individual perception. Raising awareness of giftedness, as well as implementing a trustful, tolerant, and appreciative culture(s), to openly communicate feedback, to discuss individual boundaries, and potential wishes, are identified as promising factors to create a conducive environment. Efforts from all involved, as well as allowing adjustments wherever possible, can then not only prevent potential conflicts, but can even allow the gifted mind to satisfy a variety of different interests and the need for creative, innovative, and challenging tasks. Appreciating individuality, and flexibility, should therefore be implemented as key elements of a talent nurturing environment to give gifted the best chance to find balance and to unleash their tremendous talent.

Giftedness across the Lifespan, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PARENTS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, giftedsensitivity, nonhighachieving gifted, overlookgifted, selfperception of gifted

Using Diverse Picturebooks as Counter-Narratives to Dismantle Systemic Racism among the Diverse Gifted

Paper presentation29Rhoda Myra Garces-Bacsal, United Arab Emirates University, United Arab Emirates; Hala Elhoweris, United Arab Emirates University, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; Najwa Alhosani, United Arab Emirates University, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Everest 1Thu 15:45 - 17:15

Practice based

In our commentary (Garces-Bacsal & Elhoweris, 2022) on Peters’ (2021) article on achieving equity among disadvantaged gifted, we argued that gifted educators need to reflect on how the continued ‘otherness’ of the culturally and linguistically diverse gifted is reflected in the curriculum. Increasingly there is an urgent need for educators to be more deliberate in introducing diverse narratives that “disrupt a common situation or understanding,” allowing students to “take action and promote social justice” (Norris et al., 2012, p. 59).This presentation leverages on a research project that includes the development of a diverse and international catalogue of picturebook titles that tackle themes on exceptionalities and social justice issues. Participants will be introduced to text-sets from around the world that engage in ‘restorying’ (Thomas, 2022) or counter-storytelling that serve to reclaim dignity, grace, and joy among marginalized gifted communities, dual exceptional individuals, and gifted people of color.

Pupil’s voice
_TEACHERS, diverse picturebooks and gifted, reading and social justice, systemic racism and multicultural narratives

Look at the siblings

Paper presentation110Petra Leinigen, IQ NordWest e. V., Germany

Everest 1Thu 15:45 - 17:15

Practice based

Giftedness has many faces. We know the mathematical probability of giftedness in an age-matched group, but that doesn’t necessarily result in identifying the specific quantity. Finding gifted individuals takes more than mathematics and understanding that some gifted people hide themselves very well.Giftedness, whether recognized or not, has a strong impact on a person’s entire life. When we find gifted children, it is worth it to look at their siblings. Although these siblings may be equally gifted, they may also be well-adapted to hiding, and vanish out of our sight. Many of my counseling sessions revolve around conspicuous second-born children, mostly boys. The first-born, often a girl, is inconspicuous and studious, but not gifted according to parents and teachers. In counseling, I recommend the testing of each child. Parents often act on this recommendation based on notions of fairness and equality, rather than on necessity. But the results are persuasive.

Giftedness across the Lifespan
_PARENTS, _PRACTITIONERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Counseling, Family, Siblings

Students’ self-reports regarding educational and learning capital in Greek state schools

Paper presentation115Aikaterini Gari, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece

Everest 1Thu 15:45 - 17:15

Scientific

This research aims to address theoretical and methodological aspects of the Questionnaire of Educational and Learning Capital (QELC), in a Greek sample of students (10- to 14-year-olds) in 16 state Greek schools. The QELC was administered in 740 students, in classrooms, assessing the students’ educational and learning forms of capital, the educational one (5 subscales) and the learning capital (5 subscales). The theoretical structure of 10 distinct subscales along with two higher-order factors were supported to a satisfactory extent via Confirmatory Factor Analysis. Statistically significant differences were observed for almost all educational and learning capital scales in terms of the two age bands, gender and place of residence. For the educational economic scale significant interaction emerged in terms of gender x place of residence. The results are discussed in relation to the Greek cultural setting and the differentiation of educational and learning capitals.

_RESEARCHERS, Actiotope Model, Educational capital, Gender differences, Learning capital

Back to the Drawing Board Again: The Predictive Value of Potential Indicators of Giftedness in Human Figure Drawings of Children Aged 4 to 6 Years

Paper presentation31Sven Mathijssen, Radboud University, Netherlands

Everest 2Thu 15:45 - 17:15

Balanced research and practice

The present study aimed to determine the predictive value of exceptional items as a screener for human figure drawings (HFDs) that can be used as part of the identification process of gifted children and their (educational) needs. Participants were 152 children aged 4-6 years, of whom 85 received regular education and were considered ‘typically developing’ and 67 received structural changes to the regular curriculum and were considered ‘potentially gifted’. The analyses indicated that HFDs can serve as a screening tool for 4 and 5-year-olds, but not for 6-year-olds. For 4 and 5-year-olds, the presence of one or more items within two item categories that indicate what is drawn or involve deliberate abnormalities in shape and size predict the likelihood of being in the ‘potentially gifted’ group, rather than items within a category that indicates how good drawings look.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_PSYCHOLOGISTS, human figure drawings, identification of needs, talent development, young children

State Perspective of Giftedness, next to Trait- and Non-Trait perspective

Paper presentation146Truus van der Kaaij, Radboud University Nijmegen, Netherlands

Everest 2Thu 15:45 - 17:15

Balanced research and practice

‘State Perspective of Giftedness’Personality characteristics are said to be too diverse for identification of giftedness.

Balancing research and practice, this study contributes to more insight in individual differences, resulting in identifiable psychological profiles towards new approaches.

Two Reviews and Experts Consultation focused on inner mechanisms, and heightened awareness (HA) of the G&T. In literature HA was mentioned, but not found as separate topic.

Experts encouraged conceptualizing giftedness as a different state-of-being: a ‘State-‘ (next to the prevailing ‘Trait’ and ‘Non-Trait’) perspective. Acquired by applying interdisciplinarity, allowing philosophy to introduce ‘Constitution’.

Results will increase teachers’ insight in Neihart’s four-out-of-six profiles, and contribute to address underachievement & hidden talent. Professionals in education and healthcare get new tools for teaching and counseling in ways, used in the medical world for decades.

Insight in their own state of being provides the gifted better understanding, meaning and structure for personal growth across their lifespan.

_PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, Awareness, Philosophy, Profiles, Stateofbeing

The intergenerational impact on the development of trauma in gifted children

Paper presentation223Marielle Stutterheim - Claassens, Kinderpraktijk Derkein, Netherlands

Everest 2Thu 15:45 - 17:15

Balanced research and practice

There seems to be an increase of parents of gifted children reporting their child has trauma or PTSD for which full responsibility is placed onto the school. Research in the field of attachment and trauma in general states that trauma is transmitted from one generation to the next in various ways and trauma in children is much more common than perceived. Since trauma is often missed in children misdiagnosis is common and many children do not get the proper treatment. Hardly any research is to be found regarding trauma and attachment in gifted children, therefore it is not known how common or uncommon this is and what impact it might have on the development of gifted children. It seems unlikely though, that gifted children are not affected by trauma and insecure attachment.

_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, attachement, drop outs, trauma

Teacher`s perceptions and prejucies about high ability students

Symposium253Carmen Ferrándiz, Murcia University, Spain; Purificación Checa, Granada University, Granada, Spain; Rosa María Pons, Murcia University, Spain; Ángela Conejero, Granada University, Granada, Spain

Kilimanjaro 1Thu 15:45 - 17:15

Scientific

The principal aim of the simposium is to show research studies about teacher`s prejuicies of high abilities students and their education. Also two studies about teacher`s perceptions of high abilities cognitive skills will be shown. Finally the last paper will present a summary about the topic of study. The studies were carried out at southeast of Spain.

Summary

The principal aim of the simposium is to show research studies about teacher`s prejuicies of high abilities students. Also two studies about teacher`s perceptions of high abilities cognitive skills will be shown. First of all, we present the results of the study about teacher`s prejuicies on high ability students acceleration. The work will be presented by PhD. Pons, R., et al. Secondly, we will show the results of the study about pre service teacher`s perception of working memory of high ability students. The work will be presented by PhD Conejero, A. et. al. The third study will be present the results of preservice teacher`s perception about cognitive inhibition process of high ability students.The work will be presented by PhD. Checa, P., et al.. Finally, the last work will be to try to solve the following question: How does the research about teacher`s prejuicies go?, through a systematic review analysis The work will be presented by PhD. Ferrándiz, et. al.

Presentation 1: Preservice-teachers’ prejuicies on high ability students acceleration
By Pons, R**., Fernández, M.C**., Conejero, A*., and Ferrándiz, C**.Murcia University**Granada University*(Spain)
The studies made about self-perceptions of high ability students of the educational school’s response to their needs, show that in general the achievement and valoration/satisfaction is positive if the educational practices are adapted to the educational needs and also show them a cognitive challenge. If not, the probability of school failing will grow, because of boredom or lack of psychosocial support. Results of preview research underlying the necessity of more research about teacher perceptions, highlighting school educational level differences. The aim of the work is to analyze the prejuicies of preservice teachers about acceleration and attitudes to scholar acceleration of high ability students. The sample of participants of the student were preservice-teachers university students. The instrument used was the Gagné & Nadeau (1991) questionnaire about high ability students and their education. The results will respond to the questions about who are the attitudes of preservice-teachers students to school acceleration. If they think that is elitist and if it is prejudicial for high ability students. Educational practical implications to help for a better quality education of high abilities students will be considered at the conclusions.

Presentation 2: The perception of preservice teachers on working memory capacity of elementary school students with High Ability
By Conejero, A.*,Checa, P*., Fernández, M.C.**, and Ferrándiz, C.**Granada University*Murcia University**(Spain)

Working memory (WM) is defined as the ability to maintain and manipulate information and is a basic cognitive function at the core of complex executive functions such as planning, decision taking or reasoning. In fact, performance in WM tasks is highly correlated with intelligence IQ. There is also evidence indicating that gifted children show better WM skills. Studies investigating teachers’ perception on HA children skills have mainly addressed teachers’ perception on general academic-related cognitive abilities. It has been recently suggested that perception of preservice teachers may have a great impact in their future educational practice and highlight the importance of generating balanced expectations on single cognitive skills of children with HA. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine preservice teachers' perception on WM regarding HA. With this purpose, we administered the Child Executive Functions Inventory Spanish (CHEXI) to a sample of preservice teachers to rate their perception on executive functioning of elementary school children with and without HA in day-to-day contexts. Analyses revealed that preservice teachers consistently rated higher WM of children with HA. The influence of gender attribution, training on HA or prior experience with people with HA were further explored. Keywords: Working memory, perception, preservice children, High Ability, elementary school

Presentation 3: Preservice teacher`s perception about cognitive inhibition process of High ability students
By Checa, P.*, Ferrando, M.**, Conejero, A.*, and Pons. R.**Granada University*Murcia University**(Spain)

Some teachers are aware of the existence of High ability (HA) students in the classroom. Nevertheless, teachers sometimes fail to detect them and determine their cognitive characteristics. Recent studies show that teachers tend to perceive HA students as faster in processing information compared to their peers and more able to manage their own learning. However, there are contradictory results showing actual differences in cognitive abilities among HA and not HA students. Whereas some studies found outstanding ability of HA in facial recognition or set shifting, others studies found that HA children do not differ to other children in inhibition or planning. The aim of this study is to analyze the preservice teacher`s perception of inhibition of HA and non-HA students. The participants are teacher`s preservice college students. To measure inhibition perception, the Child Executive Functions Inventory Spanish (CHEXI) version is used. The results of this study will be discussed in the educational framework and open the debate about the influence of teacher`s percepcion on the educational practice of HA students.

Keywords: inhibition, teacher`s perception, High Ability, educational practice

Presentation 4: How does the research about teacher`s prejuicies go? A systematic review analysis
By Ferrándiz, C.**, Checa, P*., Ferrando, M.** and Pons, R.**Murcia University**Granada University*(Spain)
The proposal aims to realize a systematic review analysis of teacher`s prejuicies about high abilities students. The eligibility criteria of studies are based on empirical quality, age of participants, sample size…The work will present the most significative results that research studies had found about teacher`s prejuicies of high ability students. The work will analyze the most usual prejuicies between teachers; also, the importance of preview knowledge about giftedness and teacher degree. Finally, gender differences in prejuicies teachers will be summarized. PRISMA criteria will be considered. The results will be discussed in the educational framework and open the debate about the influence of teacher`s percepcion on the educational practice of high abilities students.

Key words: teacher`s prejuicies, high ability students, systematic review

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, High ability students, Perceptions`s teachers, Prejudices`s teachers, Systematic review

Creativity composure: reasonable identification and practices, reasonably applied

Inspirational talk67Yvonne-Nicole De St Croix, Connecticut Association for the Gifted, United States

MississippiThu 15:45 - 17:15

Balanced research and practice

In recognizing gifted students for their creative talents, reasonable identification, and practices must be reasonably applied. This session will consider and provide resources towards the methodology and pedagogy behind identification of creativity relative to gifted learners, evaluate constraints associated with programming for creativity-identified gifted learners, and discuss the advancement of practices that enhance creative productivity for gifted learners.

Innovative educational practices, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PRACTITIONERS, Constraints, Creativity, Practices, Research

Even, by a Millimeter: Proximity of Synergy, Civility, and Citizenship in a Globally Aware Educational System

Inspirational talk69Yvonne-Nicole De St Croix, Connecticut Association for the Gifted, United States

MississippiThu 15:45 - 17:15

Balanced research and practice

As evident by the teaching and learning occurring over the course of the global pandemic, collaboration and access among and for gifted learners of diverse backgrounds was monumental in providing equity and promoting self-efficacy and innovation. To prepare gifted learners for an increasing global world, this presentation evaluates researched best practices, the development of curriculum and methods inherent to the authentic learning process, and the cultivation of a

sense of self that enhances student’s concepts and consciousness regarding an interconnected world.

Innovative educational practices
_PARENTS

Rooted giftedness

Inspirational talk130Lotte van Lith, A Lot of Complexity, Netherlands

MississippiThu 15:45 - 17:15

Balanced research and practice

In this multimodal, performative talk, we will meet an existentially estranged, gifted young adult. We are going to discover through storytelling that this person will be invited by his mentor to start a dialogue with four representatives of nature. They will invite the young adult (and the listeners) to understand their values, their interconnectedness and our relationship to their well-being. Through this reciprocal, empathic understanding we will reexamine what the future of gifted education and guidance may look like. Who can gifted individuals be in our vivid, yet also very vulnerable, disintegrating ecosystem? We will become aware of the unknown qualities the future entails, the qualitative adaptability and transformational giftedness (Sternberg) it demands and how human agency will have to be understood from an entirely different perspective.

Creating New Traditions, Creativity without limits
_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Paradigm shift, Relational agency, Transformational giftedness

Unlocking creative potential in the gifted

Inspirational talk304Elly Gerritsen-Kornet, Novilo, Netherlands

MississippiThu 15:45 - 17:15

Practice based

This talk is a creative walk down memory lane and an expressive invitation to start exploring your creative potential with an open, curious view and a nonconformist ground attitude because then we can focus on the process and developmental potential lying in front of us. We start exploring our creative potential so that we can use it in our guiding and teaching practices of the gifted moving together to unlimited creativity.Creativity is filling our bodies, entering our minds, makes us move or speak. We use creativity to survive, to live and to love. Creativity is a human skill we should all develop further and use broadly to feel alive and kicking. Invite yourself to a road trip of inner landscapes and start learning to live creatively!

Innovative educational practices, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _TEACHERS, guiding, potential

Personality and Perfectionism among Irish Gifted Students: Recognizing Signs of Concern

Paper presentation169Colm O'Reilly, CTY Ireland, Ireland

North AmericaThu 15:45 - 17:15

Balanced research and practice

In a study to explore the psychology of Irish gifted students, secondary students attending an advanced summer enrichment program completed a survey battery that included the Big Five Inventory personality measure and the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale. Psychologists have found links among mental health and personality – relatively enduring characteristic patterns of behavior – and perfectionism – one’s belief about how perfectly they should perform or how others expect them to perform. Four profiles were identified from students’ scores in the factors of Openness to Experience, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism. These profiles align with those found in many other studies of personality, which have also uncovered important associations with mental health. How these profiles compare in perfectionism offers additional insights to inform interventions to support both talent development and personal growth.

_PARENTS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, adolescent, big five personality, perfectionism

Coping mechanisms of gifted during stressfull events

Dynamic flash presentation237Mojmir Mykiska, Charles University, Czech Republic

North AmericaThu 15:45 - 17:15

Scientific

This dynamic flash presentation aims to examine speficifs of coping with stress withing gifted population. Its goal is to identify stressors that might be unique to gifted and to discover, which coping mechanisms are prefered by them. This analysis is based by searching and analyzing literature and composing in-depth interviews with several gifted of 20 to 30 years old. Based on Lazarus´s theory of cognitive appraisal, we can imagine there would be a specific way of percieving and interpreting stresfull events by gifted, since they have a certain way of thinking, that is different to the rest of population.

Further research might help us understand, what coping mechanisms are more efficient and then help us apply these findings in everyday lifes of gifted, and to help them chose the right strategies.

_PARENTS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Coping strategies, Gifted, Stress

The therapeutic alliance: experiences of psychotherapy patients with high intellectual intelligence

Paper presentation259Manon Savelkoul, Dutch Research Group on Giftedness , Netherlands

North AmericaThu 15:45 - 17:15

Scientific

Aim: To investigate positive and negative experiences in psychotherapy of individuals (>18 years) with high intellectual intelligence and what personal factors according to these individuals determine their experiences.

Methodology: For data collection, 17 adults with high intellectual intelligence who were in or had recently finished psychotherapy were interviewed.

Findings: The interview protocol and responses to the interview questions (i.e., quotations that were collected during the interviews) will be presented at the conference.

Significance for practice: Elucidation of the positive and negative experiences in psychotherapy of patients with high intellectual intelligence will enable psychotherapists and their patients to better identify what is helpful in psychotherapy and consequently develop a stronger alliance and better results.

_PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, Grounded theory, Psychotherapy, Qualitative research, Therapeutic alliance

Table Top!  Social-Emotional Learning Games that Work and Are Actually Fun

Workshop333Matthew Zakreski, The Neurodiversity Collective, United States

OceaniaThu 15:45 - 17:15

Many gifted children can struggle with the social and emotional skills necessary to create and maintain relationships.  While many Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) programs exist in schools, they are often not adapted to the unique needs of the gifted population.  This presentation will also demonstrate some techniques on how to teach and model SEL skills for gifted children, both through the demonstration of games designed for this population and instruction on how to adapt games. 

Supporting talent development & personal growth

Policy as a Vehicle for Achieving Equitable Systems of Support

Workshop197Wendy Behrens, Minnesota Department of Education, United States; Julia Roberts, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, United States; Scott Peters, University of Wisconsin Whitewater, Whitewater, United States

Oceania FoyerThu 15:45 - 17:15

Balanced research and practice

Robust gifted education policies provide a framework for identification, services, teacher preparedness, accountability for student learning and program evaluation. Together, these policies define comprehensive, equitable opportunities for high achieving and high-potential students. Having well-designed and approved policies in place reflects an education agency’s commitment to gifted learners and provides a foundation for advocacy. In this session, presenters will discuss policies and data-collection that provides evidence that gifted education services increase achievement and student success.

_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, Advocacy, Data, Equity, Policy

Sharing insider knowledge is important for equity in talent development

Symposium127Rena Subotnik, American Psychological Association, United States; Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, United States; Frank Worrell, University of California, United States

Yangtze 1Thu 15:45 - 17:15

Balanced research and practice

Have you ever thought you had a chance at accessing an opportunity only to find out there were some implicit rules you did not follow? This might include failure to acquire the support of a key individual to have your idea approved or supported by others. It could include understanding the importance of attending certain social events for networking or gaining supporters for your research agenda. Insider knowledge is particular to a career or domain and important in making decisions and finding successful career pathways. As professionals, we can do a lot to help level the playing field for talented individuals in a domain by making insider knowledge more explicit for those who are upcoming in a field. This session will explore the known science behind this topic, and examples of insider knowledge that might be helpful to audience members.

In response to the call for supporting talent development and personal growth, the Talent Development Megamodel, published by the proposers of this session in 2011, is continuously under revision as new ideas, feedback, and research comes to the fore. Most recently, the authors added the principle of access to insider knowledge as a contributor to fulfilment of talent. Insider knowledge, like other components of talent development, is very much influenced by domain and developmental level. For example, access to insider knowledge will impact, in different ways, the movement from potential to competency, competency to expertise, and expertise to transformational creativity. This session will include the following components: (1) an overview of the definition of insider knowledge and its relationship to talent development; (2) applications from talent domains of music and science; and (3) examples of capitalizing on chance experiences and losses in the career of one of our presenters. This set of presentations will solicit from the audience other examples of insider knowledge and discuss how we might collect and share this "shadow curriculum" with students as an integral part of gifted education. Rena Subotnik will serve as the chair of the session and present the second paper. Paula Olszewski-Kubilius will present the first paper. The third paper will feature Frank Worrell, the current president of the American Psychological Association. The three presenters will devote a full 1/3 of the session to audience participation and responding to questions and queries.

Presentation 1

Various terms have been used to refer to the type of information that is implicit within a particular context such as at work or school yet is not deliberately taught or shared. This information is typically gained in response to negative experience or positive mentoring and is often significantly related to successful performance within those setting. This phenomenon has been described as tacit knowledge, practical intelligence, shadow curriculum, and insider knowledge. Sternberg included tacit knowledge under the umbrella of practical intelligence within his Successful Intelligence model and defined it as action-oriented knowledge that enables individuals to achieve goals that they personally value. Tacit knowledge is multi-faceted and includes cognitive, technical, and social skills at both an individual and institutional level yet has been conceived as an ability, unlike insider knowledge, which is viewed as teachable. Studies have found associations between tacit knowledge and better academic performance by college students and better performance among bank managers, academic psychologists, and military officers. In this session, we will provide an overview of the research on insider knowledge including definitional frameworks, measurement approaches, and empirical studies of its relationship to performance in varied domains. This will set the stage for the subsequent presentations that will explore insider knowledge within several domains of performance.

Presentation 2

Comparing domains regarding their implicit values can be enlightening and help to identify potential categories of insider knowledge that could be gathered and catalogued. Some categories include preparing to be recognized as talented, choosing mentors and educational programs, assessing time commitments, and psychosocial skill preparation. This section of the symposium will offer examples from the domains of classical music and science. The sources of this information were collected from a search of the literature as well as studies of participants of music conservatories, selective science high schools, and science competitions as well as interviews with expert scientists reflecting on what they wished they had known when they were adolescents. Participants in this session will be asked to reflect on the ways in which domain specific insider knowledge can be systematically collected, organized, and shared.

Presentation 3

In this paper, the presenter will discuss examples of insider knowledge that have benefitted him over the years. Starting with the elementary school years and continuing through his role as an academic and leader in the field of psychology, he will review aspects of insider knowledge that he stumbled upon—such as the benefits of risk-taking and the power of personal relationships in helping —as well as insider knowledge that he was provided by advisors, colleagues, and supervisors. This session will transition into conversation with the audience about insider knowledge from the domains of expertise that they study and work in.

_PRACTITIONERS, Domains, Insider Knowledge, More equitable outcomes, Talent Develoment

Parental burn-out in parents of gifted / 2E children

Workshop251Femke Hovinga, SCALIQ, Zeist, Netherlands

Yangtze 2Thu 15:45 - 17:15

Balanced research and practice

Parental burnout is an often overseen phenomenon in gifted families. From research (e.g. Rimlinger, 2016) we know parents of gifted children are more prone to developing parental burnout. Since the complexity of raising a gifted child is often overlooked, there is little attention for parents' psychological wellbeing. During this session, the insights we have about burnout - specifically in relation to gifted families - will be shared. From a theoretical (e.g. Schaufeli, 2020) and practical (e.g. Energy Matrix model - Heike Bruch and Hans van der Loo) perspective, the causes and solutions for parental burnout will be discussed. Cases concerning parental burnout in parents of gifted children will be explained and practical tools will be given to prevent parental burnout, as well as specific tools (both practice as well as materials) will be shared to recover faster or help somebody close to you (personally or professionally) in their recovery process.

_PARENTS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _STUDENTS, Burnout, Gifted families, Parenting

Friday 2 September 2022

10:30 - 12:00 Parallel Sessions 4

Identifying the essential tensions in teaching gifted students: How teacher beliefs influence classroom practice.

Workshop138Antonia (Toni) Szymanski, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, United States

AfricaFri 10:30 - 12:00

Balanced research and practice

This workshop seeks to connect research and practice through a discussion of theoretical tensions and practical classroom experiences which arise in teaching gifted students. We have two main objectives: create an engaging discussion about the tensions in teaching gifted students and facilitate conversation amongst participants on the ways in which these tensions influence classroom teaching. The central theme stemming from academic literature, will explore several areas that are at the heart of teaching and inform pedagogical decisions such as: Excellence vs. Equity, Coverage vs. Self-Discovery, Process vs. Product, and several other central tensions. The workshop seeks to raise critical awareness regarding the tensions that teachers face in order to understand their curricular choices as well as enriching pedagogical moments in order to create significant learning opportunities. Participants will leave the session with a greater awareness of their personal philosophies and how these beliefs influence their teaching practice.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Innovative educational practices
_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, classroom teaching, gifted education theory, gifted models, pedagogy

Exploring your creative roadmap to unlock creative potential in the gifted

Workshop247Elly Gerritsen-Kornet, Novilo, Netherlands

AntarcticaFri 10:30 - 12:00

Practice based

Creativity lives in our bodies and minds, it fires up with the power of imagination, revives our senses and searches for connections. If we uncover creative potential in guiding the gifted we display a driven force to find our and their authentic selves and a way to communicate with ourselves and others about the landscapes of our inner worlds. In this workshop we look multilayered at ourselves, the gifted you guide or teach and the world. This workshop is an invitation to explore your story and creative potential with an open, curious view. Exploring your creative roadmap can serve as a guide to self expression and learning to live creatively according to your values which then can enrich your guiding or teaching of the gifted. Invite yourself and your guided gifted to a road trip of exploring self expression and start to live creatively today!

Innovative educational practices, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _TEACHERS, guiding, potential, roadmap

Acceleration Decisions are a Team Activity

Paper presentation172Wendy Behrens, Minnesota Department of Education, United States

AsiaFri 10:30 - 12:00

Balanced research and practice

Acceleration is well-supported by research and tools are available for making informed decisions. Drawing on decades of research and practical experience with acceleration, the presenter will discuss a team decision approach that is data informed and includes input from family, educators and counselors. Presenter will include resources for assisting with these decisions.

Acceleration is an intervention that moves students through the curriculum at a faster rate than their age-mates. Though supported by extensive research, many myths about acceleration exist and it remains an under-utilized instructional strategy. For students with exceptional cognitive ability, demonstrated high performance, and motivation, acceleration can ensure access to rigorous curriculum and appropriate levels of challenge. Drawing on decades of research and practical experience with acceleration, the presenter will discuss a team decision approach that is data informed and includes input from family, educators and counselors.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Innovative educational practices, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, evaluation, protocol, student placement, whole grade acceleration

Cross-school subject acceleration with focus on content and skills

Paper presentation183Kim Kiekens, SPRING-STOF vzw, Leuven, Belgium; Saskia Buyckx, SPRING-STOF vzw, Leuven, Belgium

AsiaFri 10:30 - 12:00

Balanced research and practice

The conclusion from research is clear: for gifted students, no intervention is as effective as acceleration. Accelerated students perform better, both academically and socially. Acceleration includes early entrance, grade skipping and subject acceleration. Despite decades of research confirming these findings, many practitioners are still not convinced of the need for and benefits from acceleration for gifted students.With SPRING-STOF, we translate this research based evidence into practice. We guide students (age 9-17) in subject accelerations in different topics (Dutch, History, Maths, Science) with focus on content (standard curriculum) and on skills needed for successful acceleration.For parents, we create the environment their child needs but misses in school. For schools, we share our expertise in working together, setting up a combined curriculum (partly at school, partly at SPRING-STOF).SPRING-STOF is the first and only Belgian organisation offering guidance in (subject) acceleration, co-working with the regular schools of our students.

_PARENTS, _TEACHERS, crossschool, peers, skills, Subject acceleration

Advocacy for Acceleration

Paper presentation204Annette Heinbokel, , Germany

AsiaFri 10:30 - 12:00

Balanced research and practice

Meta analysis shows that acceleration is the most effective form to teach gifted children. Enrichment is more popular and can be effective, but sometimes it just keeps children busy. I did several studies on acceleration: questionnaires for schools (twice), for parents and for adults who remember their experiences; they were born between 1917 and 1987 and therefore span 70 years. Besides I did interviews with adolescents: how did they cope with older classmates? They often profited not only intellectually but emotionally when they were in group that was a better fit. There were few problems, if so, something unforeseen had happened or adults had made mistakes. My experience also shows that too many teachers in Germany still don’t know when to suggest acceleration and how to accompany the children on their way. Therefor acceleration needs advocacy. A synopsis of research will be presented and suggestions for advocacy will be made.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_PARENTS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _TEACHERS, Acceleration, Advocacy

The Impact of School Closings on Gifted Services: Recommendations for a Post-COVID-19 World

Paper presentation133Charlton Wolfgang, Millersville University, United States

Central AmericaFri 10:30 - 12:00

Balanced research and practice

This qualitative study explored the perspectives and lived experiences of teachers of the gifted and parents/guardians of gifted learners in the United States within the context of the COVID-19 pandemic and provided a deeper understanding of gifted education by determining the meaning of these experiences. Utilizing surveys, open-ended response questions, and in-depth interviews, teachers and parents shared their thoughts and perceptions about academic challenge, enrichment, and students’ social-emotional health throughout the shutdown. Recommendations to best meet gifted learners' needs post-COVID, including a preliminary model for optimizing gifted services, will be shared and discussed in this session.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Innovative educational practices
_PARENTS, _PRACTITIONERS, _TEACHERS, COVID19, Gifted, SocialEmotional, Virtual instruction

Gifted Irish Students’ Perception of Academic and Social Experiences during the Pandemic

Paper presentation135Rebecca McDonnell, Centre for Talented Youth, Ireland

Central AmericaFri 10:30 - 12:00

Practice based

The Covid-19 pandemic caused worldwide disruption and resulted in drastic changes in education for approximately 1.6 billion learners (UNESCO Institute for Statistics, 2020). The present study focused on the Centre for Talented Youth - Ireland (CTYI) students’ academic and social experiences in their online, in-person and CTYI online learning during Covid-19. Quantitative analyses categorised student experiences into 4 groups: Teacher Support, My Learning, Resource Access, and Motivation Support. Results indicate significant differences in scores between online and in-person school learning with in-person being the preferred platform. CTYI received the highest mean scores across all categories and junior cycles scored consistently higher across all categories compared to senior cycles. Additionally, qualitative interviews were carried out on 16 students to better understand their social experiences. This study provides insight into Irish gifted students’ experiences of education during the pandemic and the effect of different learning platforms on their social and academic lives.

_STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Academic experiences, Adolescents, Social experiences

Socialization in gifted children after covid-19 pandemic

Paper presentation186Martina Brazzolotto and Sara Gasparato, University of Bologna, Italy

Central AmericaFri 10:30 - 12:00

Scientific

Our study investigated socialization in gifted children, after the covid-19 pandemic, to understand how can affect school and social inclusion. If before the pandemic the socialization of gifted children was compromised mainly due to their asynchronous development (Columbus group, 1991; Cross, 2015;), during the pandemic socialization was penalized by isolation, the decrease in interactions and the conflict experienced in the family (Aboud, 2021; Türksoy & Karabulut, 2020). In the study, we created an online questionnaire based on some items from the ICF-CY (2007), that it was compiled by 21 parents of gifted children. The results show that gifted children, after the pandemic, struggle to express emotions; furthermore, there would be a renewed tendency towards isolation during conflict management; constant derision by peers for the special interests of the gifted. The covid-19 pandemic has hindered the socialization of gifted children, especially in the school context. The implications for teaching are discussed.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_PARENTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, gifted children, social skills

One-Room Schoolhouses 2.0: Strategies for Differentiation in Today’s Classrooms

Workshop177Tracy Inman, Tracy Inman Consulting, United States

Europe 1Fri 10:30 - 12:00

Practice based

Many teachers in the early 1900s (at least in the United States) taught in one-room schoolhouses with ages and grades in one place; they differentiated daily in order to address the needs of their wide range of students. It was best practice. One hundred years later, differentiation is still considered to be best practice, yet it proves to be a most challenging aspect of teaching today. This practical workshop tackles that challenge head-on by exploring research-based, real-world strategies for both preassessment and differentiation. After learning about these strategies via student examples and actual practice, participants will leave with tools to differentiate process, content, and product through readiness and interest.

Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PRACTITIONERS, _TEACHERS, differentiation, preassessment, services

The Orchestra of Emotions, a set of 43 emotional intelligence cards. Who's the conductor?

Workshop35Maarten Haalboom, OmZin training, Netherlands; Alice Bekke, Alice Bekke & Partners, Enschede, Netherlands

Europe 2Fri 10:30 - 12:00

Balanced research and practice

The Orchestra of Emotions is a systemic approach to emotion regulation that has been developed from psychology (e.g. Fredrickson), pedagogy (e.g. Korthagen) and philosophy (e.g. Wilber). This broad approach appeals to gifted people because cognition and emotion are activated in cooperation, this meets the need to look at themes from a cohesive point of view. During the workshop, each participant investigates the use, operation and application of the Orchestra of Emotions, which consists of 43 emotion cards in different categories. In-depth and theoretical information is shared on the basis of each participant's experience, enabling them to look for applications in their own practice.The Orchestra of Emotions is an aid in relation to intensiveness and sensitivity of highly gifted children and adults. By using the Orchestra, insight is gained into the difference between the essence of a feeling or emotion and behaviour, which promotes emotion regulation; are you the conductor?

Innovative educational practices
_PARENTS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, emotion regulation, international product, methodology, unique concept

Neuroscience and Giftedness: A Research-based Unit of Instruction for Teachers

Paper presentation83Pamela Clinkenbeard, Univ. of Wisconsin-Whitewater, United States

Everest 1Fri 10:30 - 12:00

Balanced research and practice

Teachers of the gifted naturally may be interested in the brain, but they (and their professors/instructors) may have difficulty finding the time to investigate the exploding area of educational neuroscience. The aim of this talk is to present research on neuroscience and giftedness in the form of a practical unit of instruction. This unit could be used by university instructors of gifted education classes, and by teachers for their own information or to teach their students about the brain. The talk will connect neuroscience research and practice by addressing neuromyths, evidence-based teaching practices, and (briefly) research on creativity, motivation, and twice-exceptionality. In terms of methodology, this presentation is a review of the research on giftedness and neuroscience, emphasizing studies most relevant for teachers and their practice. The topics of neuroplasticity and appropriate challenge, which are key to this talk, are directly related to empowering talents and enabling personal growth.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PRACTITIONERS, brain, cognitive, motivation, neuroscience

Creativity in Mathematics: A comparison of Educators’ Perceptions in the US and India

Paper presentation92Marcia Delcourt, Western Connecticut State University, United States; Jyoti Sharma, University of Delhi, North Delhi, India

Everest 1Fri 10:30 - 12:00

Balanced research and practice

This study was designed to understand how educators’ perspectives of creativity and mathematics impacted their views about creativity in mathematics. Using mixed-methods research, 81 educators in India and the US were asked to define creativity and justify statements ranging from those that were mathematical in nature to expressions defining mathematics as a creative entity. There were more similarities than differences between the groups. Most participants from each country viewed mathematics as a creative subject. While both groups agreed that mathematics is a collection of concepts, theorems, and procedures and can be learned using these procedures, fewer educators in the US agreed that these were the most appropriate methods for teaching math and that there was only one correct answer to a problem. The results of this study imply that teachers need more support to understand the developmental nature of creativity and effectively bring divergent thinking techniques into the mathematics classroom.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, Creativity, Creativity in Mathematics, Crosscultural Comparisons, Mixedmethods Research

Creativity and anterior prefrontal functions: figurative sense, metamemory and abstraction in high ability students

Paper presentation241Celia Josefina Rodríguez Cervantes, CUCS, Universidad de Guadalajara, Mexico

Everest 1Fri 10:30 - 12:00

Scientific

Background:Creativity is the ability to re-experience mental representations (Artola and Barraca, 2004). Sense-figurative, metamemory and abstraction are prefrontal-anterior functions. The question arises about relationship between creativity and prefrontal-anterior functions.

Objective: To analyze relationship between creativity and figurative_sense, metamemory and abstraction in high ability students.

Method: Descriptive cross-sectional correlational study, 8-10 years old (n=25) with high ability (IQ=133).

Instruments: PIC-N (Artola and Barraca, 2004) and BANFE-2 (Flores, et al., 2014).

Analysis: Spearman correlation between BANFE-2 and PIC-N.

Results: Large correlations between figurative_sense and creativity/fluency (r=.834, p≤0.05), creativity/special_details(r=.811, p≤0.05), creativity/narrative(r=.750, p≤0.05), creativity /graphic(r=.822, p≤0.05), and general_creativity(r=.745, p≤0.05); abstraction and metamemory without correlations.

Conclusions: Creativity is favored by relationship with prefrontal-anterior functions. An intervention proposal is presented.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Anterior prefrontal functions, Creativity, High ability students

Teachers’ Attitude towards the Gifted and Talented Students in Inclusive Classroom Settings

Paper presentation122Esra Kaskaloglu-Almulla, University of Bahrain, Bahrain

Everest 2Fri 10:30 - 12:00

Balanced research and practice

The present research aims at finding and analyzing the perceptions of teachers towards gifted students. The researcher surveyed some private and government schools in the Middle East. Four hundred and ten teachers took part in the survey. Survey results were analyzed quantitatively using a t-test, degrees of freedom, and statistical significance. The study’s findings stated that teachers’ positive approach, competence, and ways of perceiving gifted children impact the children’s overall growth. The teacher with a positive approach plays the role of a mentor and motivator. He/she uses strategies to make the learning process challenging and engaging for gifted students. Implications of the study included suggestions for further research and approaches for teachers to support talent development and personal growth in mainstream classroom settings.

_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, gifted children, gifted education, inclusive classrooms, teacher attitude and perceptions

More to gain? A study of Norwegian teachers’ perceptions of gifted students’ equal education

Paper presentation166Gunnvi Saele Jokstad, NLA University College, Norway

Everest 2Fri 10:30 - 12:00

Balanced research and practice

In 2016, Norway came up with the report More to Gain. Children with higher learning potential (NOU 2016:14). Here it is revealed that Norway lacks a culture for facilitating adapted education for gifted students and that teachers lack the competence to identify and facilitate education for this student group. The governmental report calls for more research in the Norwegian context to change and innovate this practice. This study aims to investigate how teachers in Norway understand gifted students' rights to equal education and what practices they have concerning this group of students. The research method in our study is a survey among teachers in primary school with a "mixed methods" design. The preliminary findings in our earlier studies show that little has been researched and published post the report mentioned above. We expect this study's findings to be significant for theory and practice in education and relevant to education policy.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Innovative educational practices
_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Gifted Policy, Higher Learning Potential, ResearchPractice Partnership (RPP)

What Do Motivated Teachers of Highly Able Students Know About Teaching for Talent Development?

Paper presentation243Leonie Kronborg, Monash University, Australia

Everest 2Fri 10:30 - 12:00

Balanced research and practice

Teachers of gifted students received scholarships to attend university led Professional Learning on Developing Gifted Potential. This study aimed to explore teachers of gifted students’ perceptions, motivations, and strategies for identifying and teaching highly able students for talent development in their classrooms. It also aimed to evaluate relationships between personality traits, motivation, and creativity in teachers working with highly able students in Victoria, Australia. In this mixed-methods case study (Yin, 2009), 14/25 teachers completed an online survey which consisted of a number of validated instruments. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse data from open-ended questions. Sixteen themes emerged. Secondly, a mixture of methods was utilized to collect and analyse data; quantitative analyses using Spearman’s nonparametric correlation coefficients due to the small sample size were applied. It was found that, motivation related highly with Openness to Experience, moderately with Agreeableness, and Extraversion. Other findings, explanations and implications will be shared.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, gifted potential, talent development, teaching

Peers4Parents, supporting parents from different cultures and growing together

Inspirational talk229Leonieke Boogaard, Peers4Parents, Netherlands

MississippiFri 10:30 - 12:00

Practice based

Peers4Parents is a Dutch organization, inspired by the SENG (Social and Needs of the Gifted) Model Parent Groups, with approximately 80 trained facilitators all over the country.

These facilitators aim to support parents in raising their gifted children and supporting their emotional development by organizing a diversity of activities.

However, it has been proven difficult to reach parents with a bicultural/migration background. A small group of facilitators has therefore organized meetings specifically targeted towards these parents, during which they can experience one Peers4Parents meeting. Afterwards, parents can decide whether they want to sign up for the full program.

These ‘experiences’ are a great opportunity to investigate how the program could/should be adapted for this special target group. We would like to share our findings, so that parent groups all over the world, can better target all audiences and become more ‘inclusive’ organizations for all gifted children and their families.

_PARENTS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, Bicultural/ migration background, Children and parenthood, Emotional needs

Talent Development: A Turning Point in Social Change

Inspirational talk287Sheyla Blumen, Pontifical Catholic University of Peru, Peru

MississippiFri 10:30 - 12:00

Balanced research and practice

The aim of this paper is to provide an educational perspective on social change based on talent development in the ethnic linguistic diverse population of an Andean country. The current situation of the highly able youths living in vulnerable conditions in the Andean highlands and the Amazon forest will be explored. A comprehensive analysis involving a developmental, cross-cultural, and inclusive conceptual framework will be used. Results of ongoing studies about variables related to gifted performance will be included. Plus, the challenges of gifted education in Latin America, that underline the advocacy efforts to serve the indigenous population with equity will be presented. An example of best practices carried out in Peru, by the Ministry of Education, in order to empower and engage young scholars nationwide will be presented. Finally, implications for future research and public policies to serve talented students coming from original towns will be also considered.

_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, multicultural diversity, original towns, social change, talent development

The power of collaboration: education for talented children in disadvantaged areas - a good practice

Inspirational talk315Ingeborg Veldman, Conexus, Netherlands

MississippiFri 10:30 - 12:00

Practice based

Opportunities for every talented child!

In the district Dukenburg within the city of Nijmegen are 7 primaryschools. These schools have children in the age 4-12 years, mostly from non-dutchspeaking families with sometimes complex backgrounds. You can call it a disadvantaged area. In this district these 7 schools found it important that education for children in their schools that are talented is available nearby. So they collaborated to start a pull-outclass for these children, all schools finance thsi together and select the children that need this education. This is now up and running, 3 groups, 40 children, every week for 2 hours. A good practice providing opportunities for every talented child!

This inspirational talk will be about the opportunities that occure when schools work together to make dreams come true. This happened in a disadvantaged area in the city of Nijmegen. They provided education for children with language problems, learningdifficulties, but it was hard to provide the neccesary education for talented children. It was a joint effort that made this work. Parents, children and teachers have found the right way; meeting with peers and having fun making challenges and learn how to learn when something is a bit more difficult then what they are used to. What is it that made these children smile again? If you want to know, come to this inspirational talk!

_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, disadvantages areas, opportunities, peers, talented

Whitepaper ASD-Giftedness (Jan. 2022)

Paper presentation124Mia Frumau-van Pinxten, PPF Centre for High Development Potential , Vught/Nijmegen, Netherlands; - Spek, Autism Expertise Center, Eemnes, Netherlands; - Roelfsema, IQwise, Haren, Netherlands

North AmericaFri 10:30 - 12:00

Balanced research and practice

Clinical practice shows that health professionals often struggle differentiating autism spectrum disorders (ASD) from giftedness. Unfamiliarity with overlap and differences between these two can lead to incorrect or missed ASD diagnoses. This can lead to either overtreatment or undertreatment of potential problems. For this reason, a whitepaper was developed. The white paper can help diagnosticians make a thorough distinction between ASD and giftedness to prevent misdiagnosis. The whitepaper has already been found to be very helpful for diagnosticians and psychologists, and also patients.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_PSYCHOLOGISTS, _STUDENTS, Autism Disorder, differential diagnosis

Needs-based assessment of twice-exceptional gifted students: The S&W-Heuristic

Paper presentation222Agnes Burger-Veltmeijer, ABV , Netherlands

North AmericaFri 10:30 - 12:00

Balanced research and practice

Misdiagnoses and missed diagnoses of gifted students with co-occurring learning-, developmental and behavioural disorders are often mentioned in literature and practice. Consequently, 2E-students often fall between two stools when it comes to appropriate psycho-educational interventions. In this presentation, we will demonstrate how the Strengths and Weaknesses Heuristic (S&W-Heuristic) can be of added value in case of assessments of (supposed) gifted or 2E-students. This S&W-Heuristic was developed to assess students with (suspicion of) the co-occurrence of giftedness and autism in a needs-based way. Subsequently it was made applicable to students with (suspicion of) 2E in general. The systematicity of the S&W-Heuristic may help psychologists and remedial educationalists to reveal hitherto camouflaged strengths or weaknesses in underachieving smart students and to understand their contradictory psycho-educational needs. By shifting our mindset from a “classification-based” to a dynamic “dimensional-based” operational definition of 2E, camouflaged talent will be recognised and get more opportunity to flourish.

_PSYCHOLOGISTS, misdiagnosis, needsbased assessment, twiceexceptional

Voices of twice exceptional students graduating from high school

Paper presentation292Katia Sandoval-Rodriguez, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile; María Leonor Conejeros-Solar, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile

North AmericaFri 10:30 - 12:00

Scientific

Little has been investigated regarding students with twice exceptionality (2e) during their school trajectory and what this experience means for them. This multiple case study collects the voices of 7 2e students who have finished secondary education. Through biographical narrative interviews, the barriers and opportunities they have encountered in their school experience were revealed. Emerging coincidences were found in their stories in relation to the lack of knowledge of their 2e condition, experiences of bullying, demotivation for learning in some stages of life and motivations for different areas of human development as an emotional support strategy. The integration of these voices are relevant to guide these students in their school experiences and the transition to higher education not only to accompany their academic trajectory but also their social and emotional well-being.

_PARENTS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, Educational Trajectory, Students Voice

Educational strategies in continuous professionalisation for teachers and specialists in gifted education

Symposium116Eleonoor van Gerven, Slim Educatief, Netherlands; Annemieke Weterings-Helmons, Fontys University, Tilburg, Netherlands; Anouke Bakx, Fontys University, Tilburg, Netherlands

OceaniaFri 10:30 - 12:00

Balanced research and practice

We present three examples of good teacher education practices, aiming for continuous professional development (CPD) of Dutch teachers. In each example, the application of professional standards of teacher education is combined with theoretical and practical knowledge of gifted education. The courses are positioned within the European Qualification Framework at level 7 (master level). This ensures the high quality of educational strategies in CPD for teachers necessary to enhance the quality of gifted education in an educational context based on inclusion and diversity. We focus on three topics in three presentations. We describe what we have in common in our approaches and what we see as the underpinning for our teacher education strategies. We explain how the teacher education programmes we run ensure the embedding of gifted education in general education. Finally, we focus on learner outcomes and how we assess the results of our teacher education programmes.

Summary

In this seminar, we present three examples of good practice in teacher education, aiming for continuous professional development (CPD) of Dutch teachers in the domain of gifted education. In each good practice example, the application of professional standards of teacher education is combined with theoretical and practical knowledge of gifted education and with European Qualification Framework for higher education (level 7). This underpins the high quality of educational strategies in CPD for teachers that are needed to enhance the quality of gifted education in an educational context based on inclusion and diversity.

Speaker 1 presents how in the master Educational Needs of Fontys University, students have the opportunity to integrate specialised knowledge and skills of gifted education in their generic courses and how this contributes to the professional development of teachers. Speaker 2 describes how participating in professional learning communities contributes to the professional competencies of general classroom teachers in educating gifted learners in their daily practice. Speaker 3 presents how specialised continuous professional development in gifted education can enhance the quality of education in general and how specialised teachers can create optimal learning opportunities for gifted learners at different levels of the Dutch learner support system in education.

Attendees develop an understanding of how professional teacher education standards affect the quality of teacher education and how gifted education benefits from the systematic application of these standards when educating teachers in the domain of giftedness. Attendees also develop insights on how they can enhance the effects of teacher education.

Teacher education in the domain of gifted education takes place in the context of regular teacher education. That implies that identical standards for teacher education should be applied to ascertain a similar level of quality as may be expected from all other teacher education courses. This leads to the conclusion that the qualification of teacher educators as professional teacher educators is conditional for high-quality CPD in gifted education.

Presentation 1

In this first presentation, we describe what we have in common in the way we work with teachers and what we see as the underpinning for our teacher education strategies. This we can discuss how curriculum selection took place, why we made specific choices, what didactical strategies we use and how we can relate the strategies and curriculum selection towards the European Qualification Framework (EQF) for teacher education in general. Developing the attitude matching the Dublin descriptors as referred to in the EQF is an important part of our curriculum.

Presentation 2

In the second presentation, we focus on how the different teacher education programmes we run ensure the embedding of gifted education within education in general. In the Netherlands, an inclusive approach to education is mandatory. The political slogan used to stress this approach is together when possible, separate if necessary. This approach implies that teachers have to develop strategies to provide for gifted education in their classrooms. But it also means that we have to equip teachers with the ability to see, understand and respond to educational needs that exceed the educational options in the regular classroom. The student’s learning and development are considered to be core business in education. Consequently, we teachers are responsible that gifted students do not only achieve commensurate to their ability but, even more important, that they learn commensurate to their ability. We discuss how each of our programmes responds to this perspective on education.

Presentation 3

In the third presentation, we focus on learner outcomes and how we assess the results of our teacher education programmes. For each course, we provide examples of how we assess learner outcomes. We discuss how using the concept of feedforward ignites future learning. We explain how action research can be effective in stimulating an investigative attitude amongst our students. The process and results of their research process can provide a better understanding of how teachers transfer theoretical knowledge in their daily practice. Last but not least, we present our most significant successes in the three courses and how we use these successes for the future development of new teacher education projects.

_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, European Qualification Framework, Professional learning

Understanding and Managing Asynchronous Development

Workshop61Paul Beljan, Beljan Psychological Services, United States

Oceania FoyerFri 10:30 - 12:00

Practice based

Gifted children displaying asynchronous development (AD) are at risk for misdiagnosis. AD is best understood in the context of attention and executive functioning (EF). The presenter will review the neuropsychological basics of AD and EF, how they cause some children to express affective dysregulation and emotional meltdowns. AD may not respond to traditional forms of behavior management and the presenter will teach a highly successful intervention approach that is based in the neuropsychology of AD and executive functioning to manage, not fix, the problem.

_PARENTS, asynchronous, behavior management, development

Ambassador for Giftedness; how gifted employees can improve their organizations

Workshop192Rianne van de Ven, Hoogbegaafd in Bedrijf, Netherlands

Yangtze 1Fri 10:30 - 12:00

Practice based

The social enterprise “Hoogbegaafd in Bedrijf” (*) has developed a training for employees of large organizations to become an Ambassador for Giftedness.Ambassadors for Giftedness provide information within their organization about giftedness at work and provide insight into the added value of gifted people. In addition they create a community for the gifted people who work within their organization. They make the specific development needs visible and contribute in such a way that their employer can (even) better benefit from the qualities of their gifted employees.In this workshop company director Rianne van de Ven will share information about the concept of the training and how it was developed. Participants can ask questions and participate in a group discussion if this concept can be used in other countries as well.

(*)About Hoogbegaafd in BedrijfTranslating the company name “Hoogbegaafd in Bedrijf” into English is not easy. It has different meanings in Dutch (that is why this name was chosen). It could mean “Gifted in Company”, but can also mean “Gifted at Work”, “Gifted in Action” or “Gifted in Operation”.This social enterprise aims to support gifted adults in the context of their work, like re-integration services to help sick adults back to the labor market, career planning, recruitment, job hunting, training and personal coaching.All coaches working for Hoogbegaafd in Bedrijf are gifted and/or highly sensitive individuals themselves and can therefore truly understand the complexity and intensity of their clients.Commissioning parties are: companies, non-profit organizations, government agencies like the Dutch Unemployment Agency (UWV), and local/municipal authorities.

_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, gifted adults, work

Valuing, Teaching, and Mediating: What Teachers Need to Know About Twice-Exceptional Learners

Workshop295Claire Hughes, College of Coastal Georgia, United States

Yangtze 2Fri 10:30 - 12:00

Balanced research and practice

Teachers are often not well-equipped to teach twice-exceptional learners. If they have a background in special education, they are not familiar with how to enrich and extend and challenge a talented learner, and if they have a background in gifted education, they are less familiar with the characteristics, assessment needs and behaviors that can be part of the disability. It is not enough to merely provide gifted services part of the day and special education services another part; Twice-exceptional learners needs teacher who understand the diverse needs. This session describes the elements of a professional learning program that can be developed to help teachers develop their strength areas in teaching and mediate their less-known areas of knowledge- very much like what is needed for 2e students. Using two presenters, this session is taught in a co-taught manner to model how teachers with expertise can share, collaborate, and learn from others

Innovative educational practices
_POLICY MAKERS, _TEACHERS, Teacher Preparation

14:00 - 15:00 Parallel Sessions 5 and Poster Sessions

And then I grew up...

Paper presentation79Susana Pérez-Barrera, Facultad de Ciencias de la Educacion UDE, Uruguay; Jane Farias Chagas-Ferreira, University of Brazilia, Brazilia

AsiaFri 14:00 - 15:00

Scientific

We are used to immediately relating high ability/giftedness (HA/GT) to childhood or adolescence, but what happens when these people grow up? This qualitative/quantitative research aimed to investigate socio-emotional aspects of people identified as HA/GT during adulthood. This study included 96 adults aged between 18 and 71 years, mostly Latin Americans, who have answered a 27-questions online form investigating their thoughts, fears and feelings. Preliminary results showed that 40% of participants had diagnoses associated with anxiety disorder (f =16); depression (f =16); ADHD (f = 12); mood disorder (f = 9) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (f = 7). The identification as gifted persons has helped them in self-knowledge, despite mixed with feelings of surprise, relief, acceptance, joy, sadness, anger and insecurity. The results should support the actions of the Research Group on High Skills/Giftedness (GIAHSD) and to create new groups in other countries to serve this underrepresented gifted population.

Giftedness across the Lifespan
_RESEARCHERS, gifted adults, quantitative/qualitative study, socioemotional aspects

The lives of the highly gifted (145+), characteristics and potential

Paper presentation145Frans Corten, Werk en Waarde, Netherlands

AsiaFri 14:00 - 15:00

Balanced research and practice

From extensive life stories of around 100 probably highly gifted (145+) clients during the last 20 years, a specialized career coach for the gifted made a first attempt to distill what may characterize highly gifted adults.

A general profile for this very diverse group could not be formulated. However, it was possible to articulate 16 remarkable characteristics, life themes or life events, that in combination of 5 or more, may point to highly giftedness.

This may help to (self) diagnose the possibility of highly giftedness. It may also help to explain life events and to find ingredients for a life purpose. It gives new perspective for aims in a job or own business that fits this very rare and sometimes isolated group.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, 145+, highly gifted, life themes, potential

How HAL from areas of high deprivation negotiate access to Scottish secondary and higher education

Paper presentation108Catherine Reid, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Central AmericaFri 14:00 - 15:00

Scientific

The nature and identification of highly able students is a perennial issue within education. In Scotland, universities predominantly assess which students have the ‘potential and talent’ to succeed in undergraduate studies through attainment in national examinations at secondary school. Young people in areas of high deprivation tend to have lower attainment in these examinations, which universities compensate for through contextualised admissions. Using secondary data (n = 2478), surveys (n = 594) and interview data (n = 25), this conference paper will use Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological model to explore the complexities of how young people in areas of high deprivation negotiate access to high value assessments in their school contexts, exploring hidden structural barriers to accessing high value examinations. Bourdieu’s concepts of field, capital and habitus will be utilized to show how class position in secondary schools constrains the opportunities presented to young people to participate in the academic field.

_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, High Ability, HIgher Education, Scotland, Widening Participation

Factors of Success of Gifted and Talented Form 2 Students from Mully Children's Family Kenya

Paper presentation279David Rempel, IU International University of Applied Sciences, Erlangen, Germany

Central AmericaFri 14:00 - 15:00

Scientific

This empirical research examines the factors of success of highly gifted students in the Kenyan NGO Mully Children's Family Home (MCF), which takes in traumatized, marginalized and neglected children, provides them with a home and an education. The research builds on the results of the research on MCF Rempel (2017) and is based on the actiotop model (Ziegler 2005) and its associated learning resources (Ziegler & Baker, 2013; Ziegler et al., 2017). The aim of the research is to analyze the significance of these three capitals in the development of young people. At the time of the research, all interviewees were attending Form 2 in the MCF Ndalani Branch secondary school. Using the grounded theory methodology, the result of the study is that the social network had a significant influence on the success of the development and performance of high ability gifted and talented students in the research group.

_PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, learning resources, lowsocioeconomic talent development, marginalized gifted

The Role of Ethnic identity related to their school attitudes, self-concept, and academic achievement

Poster presentation21bMihyeon Kim, United States

Meeting PlazaFri 14:00 - 15:00

Balanced research and practice

Both social identity theory and developmental theory indicate that a stronger or more committed ethnic identity would be associated positively with psychological well-being, academic achievement, academic attainment, and psychological well-being (Herrington, 2014; Roberts, etc., 1999). This session examines associations of students’ ethnicity, general self-concept, attitudes in schools, and their academic performance. Also, this session introduce key components of a residential summer program for low-income, high-ability middle school students, designed to foster understanding about themselves and capabilities for their professional career future. Educators may be able to play an important role in enhancing positive psychological strength of disadvantaged students, thereby setting the trajectory for students’ continued success in academics. Implications from the results of the study and the focus of the program planning components to serve disadvantaged students will be discussed.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_PRACTITIONERS, academic performance, ethnic identity, school attitudes

Leading Through Crisis: Gifted Coordinators' Pandemic Experiences

Poster presentation106bKeri Guilbault, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, United States

Meeting PlazaFri 14:00 - 15:00

Balanced research and practice

ObjectivesThe purpose of this study was to explore the leadership experiences of district advanced academic coordinators during the COVID-19 pandemic. We investigated challenges, opportunities, and leadership traits of central office administrators who oversee K-12 advanced learning programs in the United States.Theoretical FrameworkWe utilized Bandura’s (1977) self-efficacy theoretical framework to examine individual level traits. We also utilized the meta-leader framework by Marcus et al (2019) that describes leadership during a crisis and the roles of self-concept and emotional intelligence.

_PRACTITIONERS, _TEACHERS, COVID19 pandemic, gifted coordinators, leadership

Gifted students in risk situations – narratives and support

Poster presentation111bTamara Malešević, National Education Institute Slovenia, Slovenia

Meeting PlazaFri 14:00 - 15:00

This qualitative study is based on a small number of Slovenian students answering two open-ended questions: What are the possible reasons gifted teenage students underachieve or even leave school earlier, and: What could be good ways of adult (parents, teachers) support for this not to happen?We reopen the question about the reasons for ESL and underachievement from the student's point of view and search for additional interventions to prevent that. We try to establish whether we could confirm previous findings about these reasons: problems with self-esteem, unconscious guilt, motivation and self-regulation, mindset, personality traits, mental health, etc. Secondly, we explore young people's narratives or experiences for alternative adult interventions to prevent these unwanted outcomes, particularly focusing on career guidance leading to good career decisions of gifted students and developing self-regulation skills.

_PARENTS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Early school leaving, Gifted teenager, Underachieving

Accelerating Development Through Mensa Youth International

Poster presentation112bKeri Guilbault, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, United States

Meeting PlazaFri 14:00 - 15:00

Background: Mensa Youth International is a cooperative community of world wide representatives that inspires development and shares resources through motivational campaigns and online access to proven coordinated events.

The PurposeTo educate readers on the importance of extra support for gifted youth.Methods: Our methods for engaging gifted youth educators and helping to develop gifted young minds range from our very active enrollment in speaker series events, an expanding resource repository and notable localized campaigns such as Mensa Grammar School in Prague and European Mensa Juniors Camp in Germany. Results: Our two primary methods of encouraging active growth and participation are our popular speaker series and our online database of resources.Conclusion: Mensa International gives gifted youth around the world access to the same social and educational opportunities through a network of shared approaches to developing gifted young minds.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_PARENTS, _TEACHERS

The Duran Model: a New Psychological View on Giftedness

Poster presentation129bYvonne Duran, Praktijk Hoogbegaafd, Netherlands

Meeting PlazaFri 14:00 - 15:00

Balanced research and practice

After years of scientific research, we know that gifted individuals struggle to fit in with their environment. Feeling different and experiencing a ‘mismatch’ with the world they live in, can greatly impact their mental wellbeing. In our earlier version of the Model of Duran and other popular models about giftedness there has been a focus on framing, ‘what is giftedness’? In our new model, we added the most important factors concerning the wellbeing of gifted individuals and how they interact. The main objective for this model is to give practitioners, teachers and parents insight in important personal and contextual aspects that impact the wellbeing of gifted individuals. Assessing which factors are causing and exacerbating the problems gifted individuals are experiencing, gives the practitioner tools to tailor therapy to the need of the individual. Assessing which aspects can serve as protective factors could motivate and strengthen an individual to accomplish change.

_PARENTS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _TEACHERS, influencing factors, Model, Wellbeing

Mentoring as a tool to promote talented youth in STEM areas, closing the gap for women: Delphi study in Mexico

Poster presentation170bMaritza Salcido, Friedrich-Alexander University in Nuremberg, Germany

Meeting PlazaFri 14:00 - 15:00

Balanced research and practice

Developing countries like Mexico need to provide educational tools to promote talented youth, however, not much is known about Mexican practitioner’s and researchers evaluation of those tools. This poster will assess the importance of the mentioned tools for Mexican practitioners by differentiating between three aspects 1) if mentoring is considered the best tool for the inclusion of young people in the labor market 2) if this tool is considered one of the most challenging and finally 3) if this type of educational resources is considered less accessible to women. By analyzing the ranking of preference for programs in talent development, we can explore experts opinions about different types interventions (Enrichment, Mentoring Pull-Out or Other Specialized Programs, Grouping or other). These findings will serve as a starting point for understanding the acceptance of mentoring as a tool to enhance talent development in Mexico.

Innovative educational practices
_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, mentoring, Mexico, talent development, Women in STEM

The Role of Teacher-Student Relationships in Engagement and Achievement Trajectories among High- and Average-Ability Students.

Poster presentation210bEline Camerman, KU Leuven, Belgium

Meeting PlazaFri 14:00 - 15:00

Scientific

School engagement has been considered key for students’ socio-emotional functioning and academic achievement. In the present study, we aimed to examine whether supportive or conflicted teacher-student relationships influence engagement trajectories, and whether, through their contribution to academic engagement trajectories, teacher-student relationships indirectly shape achievement trajectories of high- and average-ability students. To this end, we draw on data from the longitudinal TALENT-study in Flanders in which students were followed throughout grades 7 and 8. By considering the role of teacher-student relationships in high- and average-ability students’ engagement and achievement trajectories, the present examination sheds light on the potential of promoting positive teacher-student relationships as a means of enhancing both high- and average-ability students’ academic engagement and achievement. First findings will be presented at the ECHA conference.

Engaging Every Learner: Motivation & Flow
_RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, Achievement, Engagement, Teacherstudent relationships

Learning Capital and Educational Capital in Mexican Children and Adolescents with High Intellectual Capacities

Poster presentation242bMaría de los Dolores Valadez, University of Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico

Meeting PlazaFri 14:00 - 15:00

Scientific

El Modelo Actiotópico de la Superdotación bajo un enfoque sistémico permite reconocer el desarrollo del talento a través del resultado de la autoorganización y la adaptación de un sistema altamente complejo. El objetivo de este estudio fue comparar los puntajes promedio de estudiantes con alta capacidad y sin alta capacidad en Capitales Educativos y de Aprendizaje. Método. Participaron 146 alumnos con alta capacidad intelectual y sin alta capacidad que cursaron de 4º a 3º básico. secundaria Se extrajo una muestra equipada. El instrumento utilizado fue el Cuestionario de Capitales Educativos y de Aprendizaje Mx (validado en población mexicana). Se realizó una prueba t de Student. Los resultados indican que los estudiantes con altas capacidades tienen capitales educativos y de aprendizaje más altos en comparación con la población normativa.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_POLICY MAKERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, High Capacity, Mexican, Model Actiotope, students

An English, Dutch and Ukrainian conversation sheet to talk about well-being - let us show you!

Poster presentation290bNora Steenbergen-Penterman, SLO, Netherlands institute for curriculum development, Netherlands; Hanna Beuling, SLO, Netherlands institute for curriculum development, Amersfoort, Netherlands; Marloes Warnar, SLO, Netherlands institute for curriculum development, Amersfoort, Netherlands

Meeting PlazaFri 14:00 - 15:00

Balanced research and practice

In the Netherlands, there are many regional and national collaborative alliances aimed at meeting the educational needs of gifted students. Despite this, a relatively large percentage of school dropouts are gifted. Schools requested a practical tool for supporting the well-being of gifted youth.Studying relevant literature, we framed well-being as a combination of biological, social, and psychological factors. We formulated definitions for three aspects of well-being, namely emotional, social, and physical well-being. Furthermore, we summarised the main conclusions of current research on giftedness and well-being.In deciding on our approach to support schools and experts in supporting gifted students, we conducted a field study into current practices. Additionally, we consulted many experts and gifted students while developing our English, Dutch an Ukrainian conversation sheets.Does your heart go out for the well-being of gifted students? Are you looking for practical tools? Join our poster presentation!

_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, emotional, physical, social

Reading ability and self perception in primary school students in Greece

Poster presentation317bPenny Panagiotopoulou, University of Patras, Greece

Meeting PlazaFri 14:00 - 15:00

Scientific

The present study aims to investigate reading ability and self-perception in students of 1st, 2nd and 3rd Grade. Reading ability correlates positively with self-perception getting stronger by age. The sample comprised 206 students of 1st, 2nd and 3rd Grades of public and private school. Reading ability was measured by psychometric tools standardized with primary school students in Greece. Reading comprehension, was measured by Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children Fifth Edition» or «Wisc-V» and self-perception was measured by “Self-perception scale for children I” (Makri-Botsari, 2001). Word decoding and self-perception peers’ relationships are statistically significant positively correlated and both differed by gender, type of school and parents’ educational level. In addition, multiple regression showed that gender and type of school affect the depended variables the most, in a no statistically significant way. The findings are discussed in the framework of literature and finding regarding reading and personal growth.

_PSYCHOLOGISTS, reading ability, selfesteem, selfperception

A Trifecta Partnership that’s Empowering Israel's Science Teams

Poster presentation324bShira Hirsh, Future Scientist Center, Israel

Meeting PlazaFri 14:00 - 15:00

Practice based

In the last few years, Israel has become a leader in the international high-tech industry. This achievement is likely the result of progress in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields studies, among the younger generation.In this presentation, we would like to demonstrate a unique collaboration between philanthropy, government, and academy that fosters the enrichment of national programs for gifted and talented children.

Engaging Every Learner: Motivation & Flow
_PRACTITIONERS, competition, olympiad, STEM

Pivot, with Purpose: Synthesizing Gifted Education for Future-ready Student-Centered Learning

Inspirational talk68Yvonne-Nicole De St Croix, Connecticut Association for the Gifted, United States

MississippiFri 14:00 - 15:00

Balanced research and practice

When synthesizing a student-centered online learning community, the organization must share devoted to Innovative, Differentiated, Enriched, Accelerated, Learning that is tailored to students who are gifted, twice-exceptional, advanced, and those who have the potential to learn beyond their grade level. We design curriculum and methods based on professionally researched best practices in gifted education that can result in the fulfillment, satisfaction, and enjoyment that is inherent in the authentic learning process. Join us to cultivate your own intellectual, principled, creative, and enriching foundation allowing gifted students to become the next visionaries, innovators, and leaders by identifying and cultivating their abilities through creative, challenging, and differentiated programming.

_PRACTITIONERS

Learn about and experience a holistic change perspective on (the network) of gifted students/dropouts.

Inspirational talk234Akke Tick, Time2Tick, Netherlands; Sophie Louwersheimer, Time2Tick, KORTGENE, Netherlands

MississippiFri 14:00 - 15:00

Practice based

Dropouts and their surroundings often feel desperate. They feel like they have an inadequate skillset to manage the complex learning situation (of the youngsters). In this talk, based on qualitative research in the Netherlands and personal contacts with (the network of) gifted students/dropouts, Akke Tick (ECHA specialist in gifted education and change/communication specialist) and Sophie Louwersheimer (gifted working student in public administration and ambassador of the Erasmus School of Social and Behavioral Sciences) present a creative way of supporting these youngsters and empowering their network. Togetherness is a focus point. This talk includes current practices, and ideas for future improvement and change based on the Prosci/ADKAR model. You go home with food for thought, concrete action steps and inspiration on connecting with yourself, your network and (the network of) students/dropouts. It stimulates new traditions in working with gifted students/dropouts and their network.

Creating New Traditions, Creativity without limits, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _TEACHERS, Change management, Communication, Gifted dropouts, Network governance

“They’re All Going to Find Out I’m a Fraud!”  Combatting Impostor Syndrome in the Gifted Brain

Inspirational talk335Matthew Zakreski, The Neurodiversity Collective, United States

MississippiFri 14:00 - 15:00

Impostor Syndrome is a psychological phenomenon that causes people to doubt their accomplishments and fear being “discovered” as a fraud.  It is very common within the gifted population and has seriously negative impacts.  This session will explore the maintaining factors of this Syndrome and outline strategies to undo it.

Innovative educational practices

Virtual Worlds and creativity in educational settings

Paper presentation307Robert Kelemen, Varaždinska županija, Croatia

North AmericaFri 14:00 - 15:00

Scientific

Development of technology, networking capabilities, and computer hardware causes consistent evolution of Virtual worlds definition. However, regardless of the definition, the Virtual world always includes factors such as an avatar, a 3D environment representing the real or imaginary world, a multiuser environment, and interactions between users and objects facilitated by networked computers. It would be interesting to explore examples of using virtual worlds and creativity in educational settings.This paper aims to discover methods, procedures, good practices, and case studies of using Virtual worlds for creativity teaching in educational settings. The findings from this review describe the current state of the art in using Virtual worlds in educational settings and opportunities for further research.

_PRACTITIONERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Creativity, educational settings, Virtual World

Problem-Based Learning for Personal Growth

Paper presentation57Jeanne Paynter, Educating Innovators, United States

OceaniaFri 14:00 - 15:00

Balanced research and practice

Problem-based learning (PBL) motivates and challenges learners through engagement in real problems in which they see themselves as stakeholders. PBL also presents an authentic context to achieve personal growth objectives for self and social awareness, management, relationship-building, and responsible decision-making. This session presents a unique tool, The Five-P Planner, for designing engaging PBL/personal growth tasks. The five planning elements can be used to craft a problem scenario that is prompted by a local need or issue with a personalized purpose in which students have an authentic part to play in creating a professional product that meets the proficiency criteria. The resulting investigations develop both academic and social and emotional learning goals. Given the many competing curriculum priorities in schools today, designing PBL tasks to accomplish both academic and personal growth goals through an approach such as the Five-P Planner is an innovative practice. Examples and a template will be shared.

Innovative educational practices
_PRACTITIONERS, Creative problem solving, Engagement, Personal Growth, Problembased learning

The role of teacher instructional support for gifted students’ motivation and engagement: higher order questioning

Paper presentation134Sabine Sypré, KU Leuven, Belgium

OceaniaFri 14:00 - 15:00

Scientific

Higher level questioning is an instructional method often recommended to stimulate and challenge gifted students. Bloom's taxonomy can be used to help teachers improve their ability to ask effective questions. However, professional development in this area is needed. We developed an intervention based on Bloom's taxonomy, consisting of a 2-hour training in which teachers learn how to integrate higher level questioning into regular lessons, for use in any content area. We explored whether this intervention effectively leads to higher motivation and engagement of students, and among cognitively gifted students in particular.

Engaging Every Learner: Motivation & Flow
_RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, Bloom, higher order questioning, motivation

Inclusive Education for Gifted Students in the Netherlands: A Systemic Approach

Dynamic flash presentation16Jessica Vergeer, Radboud University, Netherlands

Yangtze 1Fri 14:00 - 15:00

Balanced research and practice

This presentation is about a large scale study, consisting of multiple studies, entitled “Inclusive Education for Gifted Students in the Netherlands: A Systemic Approach”. This project focuses on the impact of environmental (f)actors on educational interventions for gifted students, in order to improve inclusive primary and secondary education for Dutch gifted students. The impact of educational adaptations for gifted students may vary, depending on several (f)actors. From a systemic perspective, it seems likely that the success of interventions for gifted students may depend on involvement of different environmental (f)actors in the system around the student. Therefore, this project focuses on educational (teachers), policy (school leaders), and family (parents) actors, using a systemic approach to investigate working mechanisms and underlying conditions of educational interventions for gifted students.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_RESEARCHERS, Environment, Systemic Approach

Evaluating EGIFT as a tool for informing parents about gifted education and their child’s needs

Paper presentation271Leeanne Hinch, Centre for Talented Youth, Ireland

Yangtze 1Fri 14:00 - 15:00

Balanced research and practice

EGIFT is a free online learning platform for parents and teachers developed by European experts in gifted education to provide information on high ability students. Appropriate teacher education has been identified as an area that would help to support the needs of gifted students and changes need to be made at the teacher training level to provide guidelines for new teachers on how to work with gifted students. (O’Reilly, 2018). Additionally, we know that parents play an important role in the identification of their children and are their child’s most important advocate (Besnoy, et.al) (Mollenkopf et. al). In response to this, the EGIFT online learning platform was developed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the E-Gift programme as a tool to inform parents of high ability children about gifted education. This is part of a larger study which also examines pre-service and in-service teachers’ views on the programme.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Online Learning Platform, Parents, Professional Development

15:30 - 17:00 Parallel Sessions 6

School improvement and leadership for a resource-oriented school culture. Research-practice-partnership in "Schule macht stark (SchuMaS)“

Paper presentation208Franziska Sophie Proskawetz, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Germany; Susanne Julia Czaja, Technische Universität Dortmund, Germany

AntarcticaFri 15:30 - 17:00

Balanced research and practice

SchuMaS is a joint project that provides research-based and practice-oriented support for 200 schools serving disadvantaged communities in all German states. One of the main focuses of the SchuMaS topic cluster School Development and Leadership is on developing and testing, in partnership with the schools involved, approaches that promote an empowering, resource-oriented school culture with a growth-mindset.The development of a resource-oriented culture in the participating schools is supported with a web-based professional learning platform and a design-based school improvement workshop. These tools will be presented in detail at the conference.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Innovative educational practices
_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, Researchpracticepartnership, resourceoriented school culture, school improvement, schools serving disadvantaged communities

Incorporating the 10 Global Principles for Professional Learning in Gifted Education: Teacher Self-Assessment of Competencies

Paper presentation294Martina Brazzolotto, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Milan, Italy

AntarcticaFri 15:30 - 17:00

Balanced research and practice

According to Kočvarová, Machů and Petrujová (2016), more than 46% of lower secondary education teachers (n = 922) in the Czech Republic reported their university preparation programs and professional learning experiences lacked the topic of giftedness. However, those teachers with more experience with gifted students in their classrooms and training indicated slightly positive self-assessment compared with teachers with fewer experiences with gifted students. This study underscores the need for positive change in legislative policies, mandated inclusion of gifted education, and guidance merging policy and practice in schools. Our six week study with primary teachers conducted pre- and post-intervention focus groups to measure teacher self-assessment of essential content, skills, and dispositions related to gifted students and inclusive practices in their classrooms. We based self-assessment on the 10 Global Principles for Professional Learning in Gifted Education (WCGTC, 2021). Results indicated teachers found traditional instructional activities less inclusive, and they needed specialized interventions.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, Global Principles, Inclusive Practices

Perceptions of Teachers about Gifted Preschoolers in Abu Dhabi: A Qualitative Study

Paper presentation299Ahmed Mohamed, United Arab Emirates University, United Arab Emirates

AntarcticaFri 15:30 - 17:00

Balanced research and practice

Systematic preschool gifted education programs rarely exist in public elementary schools. The current study explored the perceptions of 16 preschool teachers (general and special education teachers) from two public schools in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE) regarding their views about various components of gifted education for preschool children. Qualitative analyses, using the inductive data analysis method, revealed several themes such as, a) the definition of and identification of giftedness, b) characteristics of gifted preschoolers, c) preschoolers’ problem-solving skills, d) communication and social skills of gifted preschoolers, resources/services offered by the school to serve gifted preschoolers, e) enrichment programs available for gifted preschoolers, f) inclusive education for gifted preschoolers, g) twice-exceptional preschoolers, and h) governmental support. The results of this study may help advocate for infusing more services and programs related to the identification and education of gifted preschoolers in public schools.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Abu Dhabi, perceptions, preschool, teacher

Positive psychology is in the air – Introduction of the e-leaning courses on ’Wellbeing and High Achievement’

Paper presentation157Szilvia Fodor, Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary

AsiaFri 15:30 - 17:00

Practice based

During and after the Covid-19 pandemic there was a growing demand for online courses and topics about mental health and subjective wellbeing in the field of education. Recognizing this need, a series of e-learning courses was developed and offered to teachers and students in gifted education in Hungary and internationally.The course consist of 16 ten-hour-long e-learning modules, covering the most important topics of positive psychology: wellbeing, character strengths, mindset, goals, positive emotions and relations, psychological capital, resilience and positive organizations. They are based on experiential learning, include self-reflective tasks, psychological questionnaires, readings or videos and they also provide recommendations about how to apply what have been learned in a classroom context.There were 140+ participants until April 2022, who gave positive feedbacks about the modules, which confirms that the course covers relevant and innovative topics in an accessible way, and it can be recommended for a wider use.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Innovative educational practices
_PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, elearning, experiential learning, positive psychology

Achieving Personal Growth and Progress through Optimizing Intellectual abilities, Emotional Management Abilities and Interrelationship Abilities

Paper presentation219Ngarmmars Kasemset, Thailand Gifted and Talented Foundation, Bangkok, Thailand

AsiaFri 15:30 - 17:00

Practice based

Bright persons are born with many innate abilities. These abilities can be enhanced and updated from time to time. The number of abilities is not static but can be increased. Those that are not innate can be acquired. Abilities are analogous to computer functions known as ‘apps’. Certain apps aid intellectual acuity, some help to regulate emotions, while others promote interpersonal skills. Bright individuals can identify these apps and learn to interweave them to achieve a well-rounded development. A well-designed development program can play a major role in assisting bright persons to identify, acquire and activate these positive apps, leading to personal growth and progress.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PARENTS, _PRACTITIONERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Abilities, Emotions, Interrelationships

Emotionnal issues on giftedness: overexcitabilities and self-esteem

Paper presentation278Maria Pereira Da Costa, University Paris Cité, France

AsiaFri 15:30 - 17:00

Scientific

In France, based on their practice, many psychologists involved in giftedness issues claim that giftedness emphasizes emotions and that gifted children and adolescents have lower self-esteem that could contribute to academic difficulties of some adolescents. The present study examined the relationship between overexcitabilities, self-esteem, and giftedness.

After a brief statement of the issue, we will present the main results of a study conducted on a sample of french teenagers. In this study, gifted adolescents have higher scores on intellectual and imaginational OEs whereas they score lower on psychomotor OE; there is no difference between the two groups on sensual and emotional OEs. Global results indicate that gifted adolescents have lower scores on social and familial scales than non-gifted.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_PARENTS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, overexcitabilites, selfesteem

Future Scientists Center – Providing Lifelong Support and Advancement to the Gifted and Talented in Israel

Paper presentation123Eli Fried, Maimonides Fund's Future Scientists Center, Israel

Central AmericaFri 15:30 - 17:00

Practice based

Maimonides Fund’s Future Scientists Center operates a national structure for academic level programming in the sciences, for gifted and talented students throughout Israel. The Center provides middle school and high school students with opportunities to participate in a range of challenging academic programs in universities throughout Israel. In parallel, the Center operates an alumni network for the graduates of its programs. The Center today has some 2,000 school students participating in its programming, together with a further 2,000 alumni aged 18-26 in its alumni network. This national cohort has and will continue to receive significant academic, social and professional opportunity and support. The aim of Future Scientists Center programming is to provide Israel’s gifted and talented population with significant opportunities throughout their lives, that will see them maximize their individual and collective potential and contribute to major scientific and technological breakthroughs in Israel and in the world.

Giftedness across the Lifespan
_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, Academic, Lifelong, Professional

"They aren't gifted; they have just learned a lot". Supporting adults' giftedness in non-formal education

Paper presentation161Halliki Põlda, Tallinn University, Estonia; Kelly Saatmann, Tallinn University, Estonia

Central AmericaFri 15:30 - 17:00

Scientific

The aim of this study is to describe the experiences of non-formal education practitioners in noticing, supporting and creating possibilities for the development of adult learners' gifts and talents. 17 focus-group interviews conducted with 64 non-formal education practitioners showed that adult giftedness is often associated with people's strengths, creativity, distinction, and heredity. Adult giftedness does not get enough attention and is not often acknowledged by adults themselves either. According to the findings, although the possibilities and challenges are related to the agency of the practitioner who can create a supportive environment for the development of adult giftedness, it is important that the adult take responsibility for the development of their giftedness by themselves. Non-formal education is one of the suitable environments to support adult giftedness, and the practitioners are the key people to creating such an environment.

Giftedness across the Lifespan, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, adult giftedness, educational practices, nonformal education, qualitative study

Burn-out among gifted adults: the moderating role of psychological capital

Paper presentation262Femke Hovinga, SCALIQ, Zeist, Netherlands

Central AmericaFri 15:30 - 17:00

Scientific

An estimated two-thirds of the gifted people (IQ of 130 or higher) experience long-term and excessive workload, sometimes even resulting in burnout. The aim of this paper is to provide insight into the relationship between job demands and burnout symptoms and the moderating role of personal resources (i.e. psychological capital). With the Job Demands-Resources model, several hypotheses are formulated that we tested by data collected among 193 gifted employees.

The more gifted employees experience perfectionism or the need for control, the more often they experience burnout. We found no positive correlation between work pressure and burnout. Also, no correlation was found between 'knowing your limits' as for 'wanting to do everything' versus burnout. It was assumed that psychological capital has a moderating influence on the relation between various demands versus burnout, which we disproved. Psychological capital however, was found to have a direct negative effect on burnout.

_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, gifted at work, jobdemands resources model, psychological capital

Are you up for a treasure hunt? A solution-focused and systemic approach in educating twice-exceptional students.

Workshop119Eleonoor van Gerven, Slim Educatief, Netherlands

Europe 1Fri 15:30 - 17:00

Balanced research and practice

Twice-exceptional and multiple exceptional students (TE/ME students) experience problems due to being gifted and having a learning disability (Baum et al., 2017; Pereles et al., 2009; Trail, 2011). This results in unique social-emotional and/or behavioural problems (Reiss et al., 2014). Teachers find it difficult to cope with situations occurring due to the interplay between the student's natural abilities and thresholds. They feel insecure whether to take action and start-up an educational plan or to wait until a diagnosis of the problem is available.

In this session, participants will explore a solution-focused approach for teachers, based on the concept of RtI and the involvement of the student's ecological system, to use when educating twice-exceptional students. We focus on the pre-diagnostic stage, encouraging teachers to use the presented strategy when formal identification of giftedness and the learning/behavioural differences have not been completed.

_PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, pedagogical strategies, solutionfocused approach, systemic interventions, twiceexceptional learners

Evolving Complexity Theory of talent development as a practical guide

Workshop75David Dai, University at Albany, State University of New York, United States

Europe 2Fri 15:30 - 17:00

Balanced research and practice

Gifted education is undergoing a paradigm shift, from "serving the gifted" to "developing many and varied talents". Talent development has a broader psychosocial basis than "giftedness" implies, and allow a much more diverse group of individuals to participate in opportunities to realize their potential.

This workshop is meant to give gifted education practitioners (coordinators, teachers, counselors) an introduction to Evolving Complexity Theory of talent development (ECT; Dai, 2017, 2020, 2021) with respect to what, how, and when talent develops, and in what way ECT can inform practice in terms of an overarching ECT-informed policy, as well as specific strategies regarding identification, educational provisions and opportunities, and counseling and guidance.

A significant portion of the workshop will be devoted to interaction between the presenter and the audience, including Q&A and decision making on vignettes and hypothetical scenarios.

_PRACTITIONERS, Counseling and Guidance, Educational provision, Identification, Paradigm shift

Lessons From a National Survey on Supporting Gifted Learners During the Pandemic

Paper presentation105Keri Guilbault, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, United States

Everest 1Fri 15:30 - 17:00

Scientific

Across the globe, gifted learners have faced unprecedented changes to their schooling because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Over the past two years, educators have undertaken mammoth tasks to ensure continuity of education for gifted and talented students during the pandemic. During this period of unprecedented disruption, educators were initially thrust into virtual classrooms with little or no preparation as remote instruction was implemented. With such a quick transition, were our most advanced learners left to support themselves, or did this environment allow gifted learners to thrive? This presentation will share results of focus groups and survey data from gifted elementary students and teachers of the gifted that explored school practices during the first year of the pandemic, emotional challenges they faced, and benefits of virtual learning. The presenters will provide recommendations for parents, families, teachers, and community partners for future teaching practices that support the emotional needs of gifted learners.

_PARENTS, _PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, emergency remote instruction, online learning, pandemic, primary gifted learners

Gifted Students Speak Out: Using Student Experiences from the COVID-19 Pandemic to Improve Online Learning

Paper presentation107Keri Guilbault, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, United States; Kimberly McCormick, University of Cincinnati, Ohio, United States

Everest 1Fri 15:30 - 17:00

Balanced research and practice

Background: School closures and online instruction were implemented in the spring of 2020 as preventative measures to stop the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic in countries across the world. In the United States and abroad, educators faced the unprecedented challenge of supporting the learning needs of students through remote learning with very little preparation time, if any. Students with gifts and talents who received routine specialized education services in their schools prior to the pandemic may have experienced a reduction or elimination of these services with school closures. This study aimed to explore how the needs of gifted learners were met during the first year of the pandemic.

Aim: The present mixed methods study aimed to understand the challenges faced by elementary gifted learners during virtual instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic and identify promising practices for future online and hybrid instructing.

Innovative educational practices
_PARENTS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, COVID19 pandemic, online learning, primary gifted students

Parents’ views of the Covid-19 pandemic and its impact on students of high academic ability

Paper presentation277Leeanne Hinch, Centre for Talented Youth, Ireland

Everest 1Fri 15:30 - 17:00

Balanced research and practice

In an effort to understand the impact of Covid-19 on high ability students in Ireland, the Centre for Talented Youth Ireland (CTYI) undertook a study in August 2020 of the parents of children who had attended CTYI programmes. CTYI provides enrichment courses for students with high academic ability and aims to allow talented students to reach their potential both academically and socially by providing relevant and interesting challenges based on ability and interest rather than age. CTYI developed a survey which aimed to provide an insight into how students have been learning, what challenges parents encountered, what long term impacts there may be, and what lessons can be learned. 166 parents completed this survey and the findings provided an early assessment of the impact of the sudden shift to distance learning on gifted students and their families, and allowed for CTYI to more appropriately cater to these children.

_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, Parents

Movie '2e: Twice Exceptional' followed by Q&A

Movie followed by Q&A328Susan Baum, Bridges Academy, United States

Kilimanjaro 1Fri 15:30 - 17:00

Balanced research and practice

How does your brain work? Thomas Ropelewski’s 2e2: Teaching the Twice Exceptional, the sequel to his award-winning 2e: Twice Exceptional, follows the teachers of Bridges Academy, a school in Los Angeles dedicated exclusively to educating highly gifted students with learning disabilities or differences, as they develop creative techniques and strategies to prepare these unique minds to find their places in the world.

Innovative educational practices
_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, 2e, movie

Creating a critical and research-oriented mindset in the school.

Inspirational talk85Kim Smeets, POINT, Eindhoven, Netherlands; Elise Samsen, POINT, Tilburg, Netherlands; Kim Lijbers, POINT, Den Bosch, Netherlands

MississippiFri 15:30 - 17:00

Balanced research and practice

Education is an often-researched field. However, not all studies match the needs of educational practice. This is a missed opportunity for both research and practice. In our educational research labs, research and practice come together. Teachers, teacher-educators, and researchers work together on themes concerning tailored education for gifted learners. A more critical and research-oriented mindset of teachers is stimulated. This is done in multiple ways. Teachers for example set up and conduct practical research at their own school. This research matches the needs of their school concerning giftedness, which makes the research very valuable for their practice. Other activities are, among others, critically reviewing scientific articles, practical articles and learning materials for (gifted) learners. In our inspirational talk we show you how your school can work towards a critical and research-oriented mindset in the school.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_TEACHERS, Educational research lab, Knowledge development & sharing, Practice oriented research

Ode to Joy

Inspirational talk176Tracy Inman, Tracy Inman Consulting, United States

MississippiFri 15:30 - 17:00

Balanced research and practice

During these unprecedented times of pandemic, division, continued inequity, interrupted learning, and exasperated educators, we need some positivity. We need to be reminded of the many joys of our profession; that joy takes various shapes from utilizing a researched-based strategy that effectively challenges advanced learners or develops healthy partnerships between school and family to the face of a child who finally owns their unhealthy perfectionism or the hearty laughter of kids finding others like themselves.Join us in this rediscovery. This talk inspires to be both practical in its advice and shared successes as well as uplifting and encouraging. Hear wisdom and joy from a wide variety of professionals in gifted education as we share their stories of practical strategies and tips effective for advanced learning as well as times they found joy working with these learners.

_PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, joy, services

Falling in Love is Hard on OEs: Dating for Neurodiverse Folx

Inspirational talk336Matthew Zakreski, The Neurodiversity Collective, United States

MississippiFri 15:30 - 17:00

Dating!  It's a major part of life that somehow feels left out of the conversations on mental health, self-care, and personal growth.  This talk will focus on the aspects of neurodiversity that can make dating and relationships challenging and how to manage them, accommodate them, and overcome them.  This talk is sex positive and LGBTQ+ friendly. 

Supporting talent development & personal growth

Twice-Exceptional Students: Identification of and Adjustments to their Educational Needs in Dutch Education

Paper presentation90Marielle Wittelings, Radboud University , Netherlands

North AmericaFri 15:30 - 17:00

Balanced research and practice

Twice-exceptional students are students who are talented on the one hand, with learning, developmental, or behavioral difficulties on the other. Identifying these students and their educational needs can be difficult due to the large individual differences between and within these students. The current research aimed to gain more understanding in, and to optimize the practices of, identification and educational adjustments, within Dutch primary and secondary education. By using a mixed methods design, we retrieved information from students, parents and teachers using online questionnaires, case-file analysis, and interviews. Results indicated variety in several psychological, behavioral, and educational student characteristics and provided meaningful insights into the diagnostic and educational processes. Besides discussing these findings, this paper presentation will stress the importance of an individual and need-based approach in the identification of and (educational) support practices for twice-exceptional students. Fostering potential talent includes recognizing and embracing individual differences and individual needs.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Innovative educational practices, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, (Educational) adjustments, Identification, Individual differences

Exploring Issues of Identifying Twice Exceptional Learners through Case Studies

Paper presentation168Wendy Behrens, Minnesota Department of Education, United States

North AmericaFri 15:30 - 17:00

Practice based

Using case studies for professional development provides a meaningful context for considering many of the most complex issues in gifted education. Case studies encourage detailed analysis and critical reflection through which educators may consider a variety of multidimensional issues such as identification of at-risk students, differentiated instruction, implementation of grouping practices, meeting social and emotional needs, underachievement, limited resources, and serving twice exceptional students. Bridging theory and practice case studies provide educators, administrators, and psychologists with the opportunity to anticipate issues they may encounter and to be able to resolve any problems arising from those issues. The presenters will model the presentation of a case study, with a dilemma that will engage the education professional and encourage detailed analysis and critical reflection. The methodologies presented will include discussion questions and activities intended to extend learning and enhance understanding.

Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PRACTITIONERS, Case studies

Small but Growing: A Content Analysis of the Literature Base for twice-exceptional gifted learners

Paper presentation178Claire Hughes, College of Coastal Georgia, United States; Debbie Troxclair, Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas, United States

North AmericaFri 15:30 - 17:00

Scientific

At the junction of gifted education and special education, “twice-exceptional” has been in use for over 30 years, yet it is not clear to what extent the term is recognized in the broader literature base. Through a Content Analysis methodology, “twice-exceptional” was examined for publication year, fields, focus of the article, and the country of origin of the article. “Twice-exceptional” or “2e and gifted” was mentioned in 2,659 peer-reviewed articles, while other areas of exceptionality were cited anywhere from 20- 400 times more often. The authors found that there were numerous duplicates, making only 1803 usable original articles. Of the 142 randomly selected articles, only 100 were focused centrally on twice-exceptional issues. Of the 100 articles, 12% were in gifted education journals and seven authors accounted for 20% of the articles. There was a significant interest in international journals and most research conducted was in the nature of dissertations.

_PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, 2e, Content Analysis, Literature

The Implementation of The Schoolwide Enrichment Model, in an Italian SEM School

Paper presentation327Lara Milan, SEM Italy, Italy

OceaniaFri 15:30 - 17:00

Balanced research and practice

The field of Gifted Education is a universe that is still little known in Italy despite in many Countries of the European Community, as well as in the so-called emerging countries, the issues of giftedness and talent development are widely known and addressed. The idea that also in Italy different education models should be adopted to meet the diverse educational needs of children with high intellectual potential is suggested by the European Community since the Nineties, but no national provisions have been taken so far. Nonetheless, the first SEM School was founded in the north of Italy where the SEM Model has been implemented for two consecutive years under the guidance of a Specialist in Gifted and Talented Education who provided professional training to the school teachers. The aim of this presentation is to describe, from a practical perspective, how the SEM can be implemented in a Middle School to develop students’ interests and talents.

Creativity without limits, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Creativity, SEM, The Schoolwide Enrichment Model

I am shaken, not broken: a creative excursion into Greta Thunberg’s positive disintegration and transformational giftedness

Workshop269Lotte van Lith, A Lot of Complexity, Netherlands

Oceania FoyerFri 15:30 - 17:00

Balanced research and practice

Many professionals working in the gifted field resonate with Dabrowski’s theory of positive disintegration (TPD). For some, it remains an elusive theory. In this workshop we will dive into the personality development of the world-renowned climate activist Greta Thunberg. By connecting her (auto)biography and aspects of her personality (growth) to perspectives proposed by Dabrowski, both the complexity of (Thunberg’s) giftedness and the TPD may come alive. Participants will be creatively challenged to examine how Thunberg’s conflicts and talents, and the external factors shaping her development are dynamically interconnected and related to her profound leadership. Participants will also be invited to reflect upon professional and personal examples of positive disintegration, evaluate critically and emotionally the experiences that may be part of such a development and how to facilitate and inspire others in both meaningful and stressful existential processes. With the increasing climate crisis, such attention to transformational giftedness (Sternberg) is crucial.

_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Evolving complexity, Greta Thunberg, Positive disintegration, Transformational giftedness

Practical Ways of Increasing the Engagement and Flow of High-Ability Learners

Workshop158Chaido Samara, Anatolia College, Thessaloniki, Greece; Georgia Tsoulfa, Anatolia College, Thessaloniki, Greece; Sofia Chaskou, Anatolia College, Thessaloniki, Greece

Yangtze 1Fri 15:30 - 17:00

Practice based

Engagement, motivation and flow are crucial elements for learning. This is especially true of gifted students as they often become disengaged and unmotivated, despite their intrinsic personal motivation to succeed. One reason is the ability they have to process and synthesize new information quickly. On top of that, teachers are observing that the effects of the pandemic have escalated the situation for all students, making them more passive and disengaged from their learning. Therefore, there is an increased need for finding ways of enhancing the motivation and engagement of high-ability students, in order to guarantee that their learning remains effective.In this interactive workshop we will discuss ways of dealing with the above notions and provide tips and strategies to address them. Participants will become involved in activities that will enrich their toolboxes with new strategies and ideas to be implemented in every setting (classroom, workplace and research environment).

The workshop will be based on a variety of interactive activities, tips and ideas that could be used or adapted to a classroom setting. Participants will have the opportunity to participate in a series of activities and will also be provided with ways and advice for putting the underlying theory into practice.

Engaging Every Learner: Motivation & Flow
_PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, Engagement, Flow, Professionaldevelopment

Discussion on the implications of the term “giftedness”

Symposium173Britta Weinbrandt, DGhK Schleswig-Holstein, Germany; Madeleine Majunke, DGhK, Germany; Dagmar Bergs-Winkels, ASH Berlin, Germany; Christian Fischer, WWU Münster, Germany; Albert Ziegler, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany; Julie Taplin, Potential Plus UK, United Kingdom; Denise Yates, The Potential Trust, United Kingdom; Leonieke Boogaard, Koepel Hoogbegaafdheid, Netherlands; Desirée Houkema, Peers4Parents, Netherlands

Yangtze 2Fri 15:30 - 17:00

Balanced research and practice

The “German Association for Gifted Children” (“DGhK”) offers advice to professionals and especially parents.Our Association has been founded on the model of the british NAGC, now Potential Plus UK. We all are members of the HELP network - which promotes the term ‘High Learning Potential’ instead of words such as ‘gifted’ and ‘highly able’.We have been talking to educational and psychological scientists from our advisory board and members of HELP network, Potential Plus UK, the Potential Trust, the Dutch Koepel Hoogbegaafdheid (Umbrella of Giftedness) and Peers4Parents.Together, we would like to discuss- what is it, that the term ‘giftedness’ does to people?- the use of ‘potential’ vs. ‘giftedness’- how to offer a dynamic view of giftedness- how to address the needs of HLP children and their families- the mission of parents associationsDGhK (German Association for Gifted Children)Britta Weinbrandt, Madeleine Majunke

The “German Association for Gifted Children” (“DGhK”) offers advice to professionals and especially parents of high learning potential children.“I am not sure if I am right, talking to you”, is one of the most common first sentences our facilitators get to hear in their consultations. Very often, when we apply for a speech at a conference, the word ‘hochbegabt’ (‘gifted’) in our abstracts will be changed into ‘begabt’ (‘talented’) by the editors. Our Association has been founded on the model of the british NAGC - which is now called Potential Plus UK. We all are members of the HELP network - which promotes the term ‘High Learning Potential’ instead of words such as ‘gifted’ and ‘highly able’.We have been talking to educational and psychological scientists from our advisory board, Prof. Dr. Dagmar Bergs-Winkels, Prof. Dr. Christian Fischer and Prof. Drs Albert Ziegler, and to members of Anna Comino James' HELP network, Potential Plus UK (Julie Taplin) and the Potential Trust UK (Denise Yates). We will be joined by the dutch HELP members, Leonieke Boogaard from Koepel Hoogbegaafdheid (Umbrella of Giftedness) and Desirée Houkema from Peers4Parents.Together, we would like to discuss- what is it, that the term ‘giftedness’ does to people?- the use of ‘potential’ vs. ‘giftedness’- how to offer a dynamic view of giftedness- how to address the needs of HLP children and their families- the mission of parents associations

DGhK (German Association for Gifted Children)Britta Weinbrandt, Madeleine Majunke

Presentation 1: Gifted or what else...?

There are so many attributes to describe high learning potentials, such as gifted, talented, highly able, exceptional or highly gifted.

What do they imply and how are they used within science and daily life? It ranges from “Every child is gifted to the IQ of 130 as a statistical criterion for giftedness.” Both attitudes are not really helpful towards children in kindergarten and school or their parents.

The concepts of gifted, highly able, talented have connotations of elitism and/or academic ability and achievement being the only/most important standard. And the idea of every child being gifted neglects the diverse learning abilities of children.

The joint funding initiative of the federal and state governments LemaS project in Germany refers to the support of high performing students, high learning potentials in reference to learning and educational chances.The DGHK (german association of gifted children) has incorporated giftedness in their title. It is also a definition of their mission.

Nonetheless they start to question the word “gifted”. Since they are often a first partner where parents turn to, the implication of giftedness can either frighten parents or be of great help to them.

Different concepts of giftedness will be presented to contribution to a contemporary use of an appropriate terminology.Prof. Dr. Dagmar Bergs-Winkels / ASH BerlinProf. Dr. Christian Fischer / WWU MünsterGermany

Presentation 2: The zeitgeist shifted -- and also the connotation of " gifted"?

In my contribution, I will discuss the term "Giftedness" from a scientific point of view. I will discuss on three levels. From a meta-theoretical perspective, I will explore semantic aspects. From a theoretical perspective, I will distinguish it from related terms used alternatively in literature. From an implicit theory perspective, I will examine how the term is predominantly understood. Finally, I will discuss possible practical consequences for the further use of the term.Prof. Drs Albert ZieglerUniversity of Erlangen-NurembergGermany

Presentation 3: Giftedness as a label

In England the term ‘gifted’, regularly viewed as elitist, frequently alienated people especially in relation to accessing funding, raising awareness about needs, or persuading educational bodies to share details of relevant provision in schools – the description ‘gifted’ has more often been a burden than a benefit.

The National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC), set up in 1967 regularly discussed terminology. Its Articles of Association refer to young people with exceptional intellectual and creative capabilities, without prescribing any specific criteria. The battle has frequently been about the term, not about the need. Given this context and the development in understanding internationally over the years about what constitutes ‘giftedness’, NAGC eventually changed its working name to Potential Plus UK and used the term ‘high learning potential’ which better describes the extraordinary and wide-ranging abilities these young people have, needing opportunities and support in order to realise them.‘Gifted’ closed doors; ‘potential’ opens them. Julie Taplin (Potential Plus UK), Denise Yates and Anna Comino-James (The Potential Trust) will share details of this shared journey, the pros and cons of changing terminology, how Potential Plus UK now uses Pfeiffer’s Tripartite Model to consider high learning potential through three lenses, and the impact this is starting to have.Julie Taplin - Potential Plus UKAnna Comino-James and/or Denise Yates - The Potential Trust

United Kingdom

Presentation 4

Teachers and parents don't always seem to be aware that characteristics associated with giftedness can be present in children and youngsters with a migration background. Educating them on such characteristics could help to identify gifted children from other cultures. However, using other concepts could also lead to more recognition and better opportunities for stimulating talents, creativity and personal development for everyone, regardless of background.The concept of developmental potential might be an inspirational alternative. It can be more broadly applied than in the educational context, and it refers to developing wisdom related to the values within a certain culture or domain. From a dynamic and systemic perspective, factors like intercultural miscommunication and misinterpretation of behavior could also hinder the recognition of talents. Looking through the lens of the dominant culture the picture of someone with a migration background can be incomplete.We want to share ideas about the use of other concepts and reflect on possible benefits and pitfalls of this approach. Recognizing the differences in culture will hopefully lead to stimulate more talents, to nurture creativity and to help children and adults develop their full potential in a way that is meaningful for them and for society.Leonieke Boogaard - Koepel Hoogbegaafdheid (Umbrella of Giftedness)

Desirée Houkema, Peers4Parents, The Netherlands

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_PARENTS, _PRACTITIONERS, Giftedness as a label, Migration and High Learning Potential, Potential versus Giftedness

Saturday 3 September 2022

09:00 - 10:30 Parallel Sessions 7

The Executive Function Basis of Dyscalculia, Dyslexia, and Dysgraphia: Even Gifted Learners Have Learning Disorders

Workshop59Paul Beljan, Beljan Psychological Services, United States

AfricaSat 09:00 - 10:30

Balanced research and practice

Learning Disorders (LD) are under diagnosed in the gifted population. Mathematical learning disorder (dyscalculia) is the least researched and most underdiagnosed learning disorder. Concepts from our recent research article "Understanding Mathematical Learning Disorder in Regard to Executive and Cerebellar Functioning: a Failure of Procedure Consolidation" (submitted for publication January 22) are used illustrate how dyscalculia, orthographic dyslexia, and dysgraphia must be understood and assessed from a neuropsychological perspective. Dr. Paul Beljan will teach the executive function concept of perception action coupling and its relationship to procedural memory and learning. Dr. Beljan will also teach a revolutionary method of using standardized assessment along with an algorithm to streamline LD assessment with 95% accuracy. The lecture is filled with anecdotes and case examples to illustrate the methodology and the process of LD in the gifted and other populations.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PSYCHOLOGISTS, algorithm, executive function, learning disorder

Highly able apprentices  - youngsters with practical intelligence - largely ignored in high ability research

Workshop232Ulrike Kempter, Pädagogische Hochschule Oberösterreich, Austria; Ramona Uhl, Pädagogische Hochschule Oberösterreich, Linz, Austria

AntarcticaSat 09:00 - 10:30

Balanced research and practice

High ability is still mainly connotated with academic domains and research based data are numerous in this field. But when it comes to vocational trainings or professional talents research is comparatively sparse.

In order to create a new tradition in talking about highly able persons we want to demonstrate how we can integrate apprentices and their practical intelligence into high ability research and practice.

School leaving certificates playing still an important role in judging whether someone is talented or not many young people are not detected in their potential which lies out of school subjects. The keyword is identification plus coaching and training. This is why a special training for vocational trainers together with enterprises as well as a tool for accompanying coaching was developed. The target audience of educators, professional trainers and parents will get the chance to discuss the tool and the dual vocational training of Austria.

Creating New Traditions, Innovative educational practices
_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, coaching highly able apprentices, practical intelligence, vocational training

Personalized Learning Plan to design inclusive activities for gifted children

Paper presentation185Martina Brazzolotto and Sara Gasparato, University of Bologna, Italy

AsiaSat 09:00 - 10:30

Balanced research and practice

According to Kettler and Taliaferro (2022) personalized learning is a pedagogical approach that focuses on pupils' needs, interests, and talents. The Personalized Learning Plan (PLP) for gifted children is an educational tool that favors the application of personalized teaching.

In our study we collected the responses of 61 Italian teachers who filled out an online questionnaire, after having participated in at least one training meeting on PLP for gifted children. The goals of the research were: a) to collect teachers' perceptions of PLP for gifted children; b) to gather teacher’s ideas to create a national PLP model.

The results show that the PLP is considered useful by teachers to implement inclusive teaching, share objectives and methods with colleagues, document activities. The new PLP model demonstrates the need for teachers to balance the cognitive traits, social skills, talents, involving parents. The Italian PLP model will be presented in digital format.

Innovative educational practices
_PARENTS, _TEACHERS, gifted children, personalized plan

Impact of a program by grouping on the creativity of girls and boys with high abilities

Paper presentation252Julián Betancourt Morejón, University of Guadalajara, Mexico; Maria de los Dolores Valadez Sierra, CUCS, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico

AsiaSat 09:00 - 10:30

Scientific

Total grouping for the attention of students with high abilities has had a positive impact both academically, socially, emotionally and creatively. There has been much discussion as to whether creativity differs according to gender; however, the results of various studies have been contradictory.A pre-experimental study was carried out with the participation of 21 females and 37 males with high abilities who attended from fourth to sixth grade of elementary school in a school by total grouping. The Creative Imagination Test for Children (PIC-N) was administered at the beginning and end of the school year. The results show the importance of working on creativity with these students within the curriculum. The absence of differences between sexes agrees with the results obtained in previous studies.

_PSYCHOLOGISTS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, empowerment, girls, psychological development

The relationships between intelligence and creativity in children with high potential

Paper presentation312Merav Dechaume, University of Paris-Cité, France

AsiaSat 09:00 - 10:30

Balanced research and practice

21st century-skill frameworks in the educational field can benefit from studies exploring accelerated development and expression in childhood and adolescence. Those objectives include such social acts as knowledge sharing, thinking, innovation and creation. In this presentation we seek to explore further data collected at the National Center for Assistance to children and adolescents with High Potential in large samples of children in France. Our aim is to study the relationships between intelligence and creativity by examining the threshold hypothesis with regard to the different cognitive domains of high intellectual potential (measured by WISC indices) and of high creative potential (measured by EPOC indices). We were particularly interested through this study in conceptualizing giftedness as both intellectual potential and creative potential, as both include cognitive mechanisms for stimulating thought and intellectual curiosity.

_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, Creative potential, Intellectual potential, Measurement, Threshold hypothesis

Equity in gifted education

Dynamic flash presentation93Lineke van Tricht, Radboud University, Netherlands

Central AmericaSat 09:00 - 10:30

Scientific

In the Netherlands, gifted education has been a topical issue for the last two decades, because teachers seem to be struggling with providing gifted students with fitting education. Another issue in Dutch education is the growing inequity in opportunities to gain access into the higher levels of secondary education between students from families with a high and low socioeconomic status. The aim of this study was to gain insights into the relationship between high intellectual performance, low SES and motivation.

Engaging Every Learner: Motivation & Flow
_RESEARCHERS, gifted secondary education, inequity, low socioeconomic status, motivation

Giftedness and Meritocracy – Curse or Blessing? A Qualitative Case Study in an Austrian Primary School

Dynamic flash presentation276Salma Baghajati, London Metropolitan University , United Kingdom

Central AmericaSat 09:00 - 10:30

Balanced research and practice

Despite increased discussions in academic discourse about the causes of inequality, especially through meritocracy, these debates rarely reach teachers in gifted education. In my qualitative case study, I explored gifted interventions from a teachers’ and students’ perspective to analyse the impact of the meritocratic approach in gifted education on disadvantaged students. I found that the absence of a common definition of giftedness among the teachers led to equating giftedness with high performance. Moreover, the school's emphasis on academic subjects in gifted education led many children to define their giftedness based on their academic achievement. Since disadvantaged students achieve lower, the main benefiters of gifted education are white-middle-class students. The aim of my research is to provide potential solutions for both the Austrian policy makers and practitioners on how to effectively enable talent development and personal growth for all students independent of their background by connecting research and practice.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, case study, gifted programmes, meritocracy, talent development

What makes highly able drop-outs happy?

Dynamic flash presentation311Jarmo Schoemaker, University of Twente/SLO, Netherlands

Central AmericaSat 09:00 - 10:30

Balanced research and practice

Dutch schools have the responsibility to provide a suitable learning place to every child. In spite of this, there are a lot of drop-outs and a relatively large percentage of these drop-outs are gifted.This (still ongoing) research aims at finding factors that influence the happiness of highly able drop-outs, in order to help teachers in offering fitting education to these children and improving the well-being of the drop-outs. By letting a highly-able interviewer from approximately the same age group talk to 50 highly able drop-outs in their own environment instead of sending out a survey, we hope that the gifted drop-outs will open up more. Additionally, their counsellors will be interviewed. The discussion following the presentation will focus on the finding we have in September and ways to connect the outcomes of the research to practice in such a way that the goal of improving happiness can be reached.

Engaging Every Learner: Motivation & Flow
_PRACTITIONERS, _TEACHERS, Dropout, Highly able, Needs

'Let's start at the very beginning'

Workshop224Liesbet Stam-Gommans, CBO TD & Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands; Lilian van der Poel, XL-leren & ukIQ, Netherlands; Annemieke Nagel, AnnemIQ & Stichting Klasse, Gouda, Netherlands; Ragnild Zonneveld, Cedin Onderwijs (Education), Drachten, Netherlands

Europe 1Sat 09:00 - 10:30

Balanced research and practice

Let’s start at the very beginning… a very good place to start!Practice shows that gifted potential in young children is poorly recognized by professionals. Wellisch (2017) writes about it too. Learning starts in the early years… or not. Especially, children in the age of 2-4 can be misunderstood and their behaviour misinterpreted and therefore explained in a way that does not match the possibilities of the toddler. This can enhance the risk of a frustrated school career (Mooij et al., 2012; Papierno et al., 2005; Leavers et al., 2016).In this workshop we travel from identifying young, gifted children to suggesting what they need to thrive. On our journey we will meet Nottingham and Nottingham (‘Challenging, using their Early Learning’, 2019), the pedagogy of the Reggio Emilia approach (Gardini, 1993; Malagucci, 1993) and we will look closely at learning of young, gifted learners. Please join us on our travels.

We have prepared a hands-on workshop about young learners. Do you want to learn more about identifying and working with these young ones, please join us in this workshop. We are more than prepared to tell you more and we are looking forward to working with you!

Engaging Every Learner: Motivation & Flow, Supporting talent development & personal growth
_PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _TEACHERS, Action, Toddler, Young learner

Discovering hidden talent: identifying gifted students with a migration background and designing fitting education for them

Workshop268Femke Hovinga, SCALIQ, Zeist, Netherlands

Europe 2Sat 09:00 - 10:30

Balanced research and practice

Students with a migration background are often overlooked. Stigmas play a role, and so does the development of language and the learning opportunities students with a migration background often lack. In the current study emphasis is put on a group of possibly gifted students with a migration background and how to identify them. Once found, what is the best way to have them flourish in the educational system? This workshop provides insights from the study as well as hands-on advice for those working with families with a migration background.

_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _TEACHERS, gifted underachievers, hidden talent, migration background

mBET-teen - A Gifted and Talented Counseling Tool for Lower Secondary Education?

Paper presentation54Martina Rosenboom, Talentconsulting.info, Germany

Everest 1Sat 09:00 - 10:30

Balanced research and practice

The multiple talent development tool mBET was developed to bring children, their teachers and their parents into a conversation about talent and its support. In most cases, the trained mBET users are teachers themselves, who take on the role of facilitators. The use of mBET as a tool for structured observation in gifted and talented education is a door opener for constructive discussion about individual interests, potentials and strengths.

However, the target group is restricted: Questions addressed to elementary school children would have to be formulated differently for secondary school children.

The questionnaire has now been revised for teenagers (up to about grade 7). How does this affect parent and teacher questionnaires? What scientific principles are changing? For which types of schools is such a tool suitable?The procedure and first results will be presented. An exchange of experiences with experienced mBET users is explicitly desired!

Pupil’s voice
_PRACTITIONERS, observation, potential

Initiative to Support Gifted and Talented Pupils in Germany: Adaptive Formats of Diagnosis-Based Individual Promotion

Paper presentation305Christian Fischer, University of Münster, Germany; Christiane Fischer-Ontrup, University of Münster, Germany

Everest 1Sat 09:00 - 10:30

Balanced research and practice

The federal and state initiative "Leistung macht Schule" (LemaS) is being implemented in 2018 to support especially high-performing and potentially highly capable students in Germany. 18 universities and 300 schools in all 16 federal states work together on concepts for gifted education and talent support and their implemtation in school. Adaptive formats of diagnosis-based individual challenge and support are being developed for sustainable gifted education and talent support. The foundation is the Challenge and Support Project for self-regulated and research-based learning for gifted and talented students. First results of an interim survey of this Research Practice Partnership with the school management and involved teachers are presented as well as first evaluations of group discussions with pupils and teachers who were part of the project.

Innovative educational practices
_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, Research Practice Partnership, SelfRegulated Learning

Digitial formative assesment tools and math talent in primary education: helping hand or constricting corset?

Paper presentation319Ingrid Maas, De Groeiling, Netherlands

Everest 1Sat 09:00 - 10:30

Balanced research and practice

Differentiating is a complex teacher ability and task. Recent research of the Dutch Inspectorate of Eduction shows that differentiation during math classes exists, but is insufficient in many aspects concerning the needs of math talent. Lack of time and knowledge how to differentiate fort his particular group here play an important role. Digital adaptive assesment tools seem an interesting innovation that can support help teachers in performing this the complex task and they are already used in most of the dutch classrooms in primary education to support math eduction.

_RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, Differentiation practises, digital formative assesment tools, math talent, primary education.

Living on the edge; Learning, flourishing and contributing in all ages

Symposium27Rianne van de Ven, Hoogbegaafd in Bedrijf, Netherlands; Frans Corten, Werk en Waarde, Netherlands; Noks Nauta, Instituut Hoogbegaafdheid Volwassenen, Netherlands

Everest 2Sat 09:00 - 10:30

Practice based

In this symposium three professionals, who each have about 20 years of experience in working and interacting with the gifted from the age of young adults until the end of life, share their observations and insights. How do these gifted learn and develop in all these stages of life? How do they gather wisdom and find their personal/specific purposes in work and life? How can they still serve society when they are retired from work?We share examples, experiences and ways to find a better living climate, we formulate some special needs and restrictions and we are open for discussion. How can a better living climate be realized for the development of the gifted all over the world?There is hardly any research on the development of gifted along the lifespan. Until now, most knowledge is gathered by observation in practice.

In young age gifted may look oldish and too wise for their age. As young adults they may want to achieve goals that only seem to be allowed to people in their forties. In the midlife period of their gifted lives, their identity formation seems important again. When their retirement comes nearby, they often still want to be an innovator and they create, start or develop new projects, studies or ideas. We conclude that age is a non-fitting concept for gifted people: they do not act according to the preconceived ideas of their environment. This may lead to challenges in various situations, where they search for opportunities to live their lives on their own way.In this symposium three professionals, who each have about 20 years of experience in working and interacting with the gifted from the age of young adults until the end of life, share their observations and insights. How do these gifted learn and develop in all these stages of life? How do they gather wisdom and find their personal/specific purposes in work and life? How can they still serve society when they are retired from work?We share examples, experiences and ways to find a better living climate, we formulate some special needs and restrictions and we are open for discussion. How can a better living climate be realized for the development of the gifted all over the world?There is hardly any research on the development of gifted along the lifespan. Until now, most knowledge is gathered by observation in practice. The speakers have written several books and other publications to share their observations and give a start for further research.Rianne van de Ven: Giftedness in practice. Strengthening personal leadership in gifted adults (2022)Frans Corten: Exceptional Talent. A guide for the gifted, the inventors and other birds of a rare feather (2021)Noks Nauta: Hoogbegaafde senioren (2020) (Gifted seniors, book in Dutch)

Presentation 1

In The Netherlands prior to 2000, no educational programs were available for gifted children. Even today no certainty exists that children will be identified as being gifted at an early age or provided with the specialized educational support they require. However, interest in gifted children is growing in the Netherlands, and because of this new attention, many adults are beginning to recognize their own gifted characteristics. Late (adult) identification as “gifted” often leads to feelings of mourning for what might have been, but also invigorates a passion for personal growth.Rianne van de Ven has been guiding these adults as a professional coach for 15 years. In her lecture she will talk about how gifted adults can grow when they expand their toolbox of strategies and strenghten their personal leadership.

Rianne van de Ven: Giftedness in practice. Strengthening personal leadership in gifted adults (2022)

Presentation 2

Gifted adults may have problems to learn in formal situations (like school, college, university, courses, trainings). They are easily bored on one hand and they often do not feel safe enough to open themselves for a learning or transforming experience on the other hand. We observe that often used methods in assessments, psychological interventions and education programs may not be effective for them. They stay outside or even above the learning process. They have built up several unpleasant experiences at school: when they showed themselves in their authentic preferences and fields of interest, they were ignored, bullied or laughed at, resulting in accumulating microtraumas.The result is that they do not learn from lighter interventions and are too anxious to open themselves for a more intense learning experience. This keeps them back from finding pleasure and purpose in work and life. How and where to find methods that are rewarding and interesting to them, and safe enough to open themselves for learning transforming experiences?

Frans Corten: Exceptional Talent. A guide for the gifted, the inventors and other birds of a rare feather (2021)

Presentation 3

Gifted seniors literally live towards, and, like gifted adults, on the edge of life. Characteristics of giftedness are still present in older gifted individuals, but can be expressed in a very different way than at a younger age. Not all of them know they are gifted. While many still have a lot to offer to the people around them and to society, their former (work) position in society can enable some to do so successfully. But many others don't realize their potential or know how to initiate new activities. Society generally only has average expectations of seniors, far from the (intellectual) edge.Aging comes with the loss of loved ones. In this group, this leads to even more difficulties in finding peers and building meaningful contacts. With the need for physical assistance, the loss of autonomy is a major challenge. Disappointment in life may even lead to feelings of depression. Also we see conflicts with, for example, care providers. So far, the combination of giftedness and dementia has not been studied, except in a few case studies.Knowledge of how giftedness manifests itself in old age is essential for the well-being of these people.Noks Nauta: Hoogbegaafde senioren (2020) (Gifted seniors, book in Dutch)

Giftedness across the Lifespan
_POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, gifted adults, highly gifted, personal leadership, seniors

Movie '2e2: Teaching the Twice Exceptional' followed by Q&A

Movie followed by Q&A329Susan Baum, Bridges Academy, United States

Kilimanjaro 1Sat 09:00 - 10:30

Balanced research and practice

2e: Twice Exceptional examines the concept of “twice exceptionality” –

gifted or highly gifted children with learning disabilities and/or differences – from the perspectives of the students themselves, as well as their parents and educators.

These students have vexed their parents and are often considered “at risk” by traditional school systems. Yet they are our next-gen geniuses, mavericks and dreamers – Malcolm Gladwell’s budding “outliers.”

They may grow up to change the world… if they can survive the American school system and their own eccentricities.

2e: Twice Exceptional focuses on middle school and high school students at Bridges Academy in Studio City, California. Bridges Academy is one of the first schools in America dedicated solely to the education of 2e students. The school has attracted the interest of the international educational community for its inspired approach in looking “outside the box” to develop creative educational solutions to engage these unique students.

Innovative educational practices
_POLICY MAKERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _TEACHERS, 2e, brain, movie, school

The Swedish gifted doctoral programme and The Nordic Network for Gifted Education

Symposium248Elisabet Mellroth, City of Karlstad, Karlstad University, Sweden; Helen Brink, Karlstad University, Sweden; Jóhann Örn Sigurjónsson, University of Iceland, Iceland

MississippiSat 09:00 - 10:30

Scientific

This symposium aims to spread knowledge from two relatively new initiatives within gifted education from the Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland, Island, Norway and Sweden. A Swedish doctoral programme on gifted education that started in the end of 2021 that aims to develop knowledge on gifted education related to the Swedish education system. Ten doctoral students will focus their research on education of gifted students in Swedish pre-school, primary and secondary school. The doctoral students will cover a wide range of areas and subjects such as for example language, sports, digital competence, dyslexia, and mental health in pupils. Methodologically there will be both quantitative and qualitative studies. The doctoral students will build capacity for gifted students needs in the Swedish education system. Professor Valerie Margrain at Karlstad University lead the doctoral programme in collaboration with Associated professor Johanna Lundqvist at Mälardalen University and Professor Mara Westling Allodi at Stockholm University, the program is founded by the Swedish Research Council. In this symposium we get the opportunity to listen and discuss the research plans of one of the doctoral students.In parallel with the development of the doctoral program, researchers in the Nordic countries found a need to create a Nordic network. The Nordic countries have similar education system and in many ways similar culture and traditions, in addition all Nordic countries are relatively small countries which makes collaboration extra important. The aim with the Nordic Network for Gifted Education (NNGE) is to connect and support Nordic researchers in the field of gifted education. In addition, the network aims to find and nurture research on gifted education that spans over some or all of the Nordic countries. An important part will for example be to apply for funding. We expect the researchers in the network to develop important research on gifted education that fits into the inclusive school systems in the Nordic countries. An important goal is that the results will help to improve practice to better embrace gifted pupils learning needs. Since this network is relatively new, cross-country projects are still not started, but sharing Nordic research in the network is another important aim. In this symposium two separate research projects are presented one ongoing Swedish project in mathematics at upper secondary and one that through a literature review presents current opportunities and possible future directions for gifted and talented students in Iceland.

Presentation 1: Digital design tools in gifted students technology education

Author: Helen Brink, Karlstad University
It is common to teach about design and product development using digital design tools when teaching technology in lower secondary school in Sweden, and all students are supposed to develop digital competence. Digital design tools enable differentiated teaching and it is important to learn more about this, especially regarding gifted students.The aim of this study is to develop knowledge about teaching design and product development to gifted students, and to explore if and how digital design tools can stimulate and challenge these students. The study also aims to identify important features regarding gifted students’ technology education, of use for both teachers and teacher educators.The study is planned as a design study where researcher and teachers together develop and analyze the teaching. It is expected that the result of the study can be used to guide teachers in technology to better include their gifted students in learning, the results are also expected to increase the knowledge base of differentiated teaching in technology in inclusive settings.

Presentation 2: Gifted education in Iceland: Current state and future directions
Author: Jóhann Örn Sigurjónsson, University of Iceland
Iceland follows a Nordic model of education: a school for all with inclusive education policies. The national curriculum states a right to “appropriate study opportunities” and “more demanding and meaningful study” for gifted and talented students. This presentation aims to describe current opportunities for gifted and talented students and possible future directions for policy and practice through a review of literature and documents. The Icelandic national curriculum both permits acceleration, a common offer to gifted and talented students’ needs, and encourages “deepening of knowledge”, e.g., through electives based on interest. The proportion of Icelandic students at the highest levels in PISA is low. Systematic support for teachers and their practice of deepening remains unclear. De-facto extracurricular opportunities exist for gifted and talented students in secondary school, mostly mathematics-specific. Currently, no specific extracurricular opportunities exist for gifted and talented students under the age of 12. A wide space for innovation and development is evident in offering richer opportunities for gifted and talented students. An argument is made that future directions for gifted education policy and practice in Iceland may involve further international research collaboration and to establish systematic support for teachers, e.g., through professional development or specialization programs.

Presentation 3: Online mathematical challenges for gifted upper secondary students
Authors: Elisabet Mellroth1,2 and Attila Szabo3,41 Karlstad University, 2 City of Karlstad, 3 Stockholm University 4 City of Stockholm
Empirical studies on gifted students are unusual especially in the Swedish educational context. In Sweden, teachers are obliged to offer all students learning opportunities and expected to educate and stimulate also these students in regular, mixed-ability classrooms. This study aims to, from a student perspective, investigate benefits and disadvantages of an online initiative meant to support mathematically talented upper secondary student. It was performed in an upper-secondary school with ca 900 students at programs intensive in mathematics. A challenging task is placed in students’ individual online platform, in which the student also places his/her solutions. Students are encouraged to contact the teacher through a chat function when they have a solution or if they need help. Afterwards, the teacher give feedback on their solutions, as well as proposing them new, challenging tasks, and so on. To investigate the student’s perception of this way of getting challenges, the study consists of a survey-based investigation. Preliminary results will be presented at the symposium. This study is also presented as a poster at the 12th international group for mathematical creativity and giftedness conference in September 2022.

Connecting Research & Practice in Meaningful Ways
_RESEARCHERS, Doctoral programme, Nordic countries, Research network

Focusing on talents in autistic gifted children

Workshop207Adi Van den Brande, Het Lampje, Belgium

North AmericaSat 09:00 - 10:30

Practice based

Many autistic, gifted children drop out of education because their autism is not recognized as such or because their environment does not make appropriate adjustments. They cannot fully use their potential and talents and often experience psychological difficulties.Correct identification of these children is the basis for being able to use their talents. This screening consists of drawing up a strength-weakness profile aimed at their cognitive skills and processing of information.This workshop aims to give teachers, coaches and counselors of gifted children insight into the different way of thinking of autistic gifted children. They are given tools to recognize and signal this different way of thinking and experience why it is of great importance to also use this approach in when faced with difficulties. By analyzing classroom materials developed for gifted students, the participants translate the acquired knowledge into practice.

_PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _TEACHERS, Autism, Gifted, High functional

Cartooning through Perfectionism

Workshop334Matthew Zakreski, The Neurodiversity Collective, United States

OceaniaSat 09:00 - 10:30

Drawing is a very complex and emotional task for many gifted kids.  It is something that seems easy to do (if you're good at it) and simultaneously impossible to learn.  Regardless of your interest and skill level in drawing, it is far too easy to be overwhelmed by examples of expert-level drawings that increase intimidation and self-doubt.  As such, drawing brings up many intense feelings of maladaptive perfectionism and avoidance in gifted kids.  This workshop will draw on Dr. Zakreski's skills as a psychologist and a cartoonist to explore how to use drawing cartoons to undo perfectionism.

Supporting talent development & personal growth

Conversation tool for well-being: let’s talk about it!

Workshop289Nora Steenbergen-Penterman, SLO, Netherlands institute for curriculum development, Netherlands; Hanna Beuling, SLO, Netherlands institute for curriculum development, Amersfoort, Netherlands; Marloes Warnar, SLO, Netherlands institute for curriculum development, Amersfoort, Netherlands

Oceania FoyerSat 09:00 - 10:30

Balanced research and practice

In the Netherlands, there are many regional and national collaborative alliances aimed at meeting the educational needs of gifted students. Despite this, a relatively large percentage of school dropouts are gifted. Schools for the gifted and talented have requested a practical tool for supporting the well-being of gifted youth.Studying relevant literature, we (SLO) framed well-being as a combination of biological, social, and psychological factors. We formulated definitions for three aspects of well-being, namely emotional, social, and physical well-being. Furthermore, we summarised the main conclusions of current research on giftedness and well-being.In deciding on our approach to support schools and experts in supporting gifted students, we conducted a field study into current practices. Additionally, we consulted with many experts and gifted students while developing our conversation tool.Does your heart go out for the well-being of gifted students? Are you looking for a practical tool? Join our workshop!

_PARENTS, _POLICY MAKERS, _PRACTITIONERS, _PSYCHOLOGISTS, _RESEARCHERS, _STUDENTS, _TEACHERS, emotional, physical, social

Developing capacities of imagination

Workshop326Kristin Berman, Phoenix Elementary Division, United States

Yangtze 1Sat 09:00 - 10:30

Balanced research and practice

Using the framework established by Lincoln Center Institute (New York) for Aesthetic Education, this workshop will present an interactive demonstration of a process that develops capacities of imagination such as deep noticing, questioning, and making connections to ideas leading to understanding and making meaning. Participants will experience different genres of arts, and learn how this promotes the strengths of gifted and twice exceptional students. Using great works of art from artists such as Chagall and Copland as entry points to curriculum not only connect to historical periods and community, but helps students embody the experiences of others, developing empathy and making meaning in deeper ways. Participants will be able to create a lesson that will encompass the components of the Lincoln Center Framework to develop the capacities of imagination, create activities that embody the meaning of a work of art, and practice the process of inquiry questioning.

Through the experiential process, participants will come to understand the purpose of aesthetic education in the development of creative teaching and learning as well as in personal growth.

_PRACTITIONERS, _TEACHERS, arts, imagination

Goodness-of-fit and the Gifted: A Dialogue Toolbox

Workshop38Mia Frumau-van Pinxten, PPF Centre for High Development Potential , Vught/Nijmegen, Netherlands

Yangtze 2Sat 09:00 - 10:30

Balanced research and practice

A mismatch between the internal developmental systems of gifted individuals and external social systems (school, age peers) gives rise an almost unavoidable lack of goodness-of-fit. Goodness-of-fit is a homeostatic mechanism that seeks an optimal match between individual and contextual characteristics. Not finding an optimal match can be a painful experience and cumulative negative reactions from the environment can lead to “t” traumas. The Dialogue Toolbox on Goodness-of-Fit for the gifted is research and practice-based and is a tool intended for exploring, visualizing, overviewing and deepening four important aspects directly linked to (a lack of) goodness-of-fit: internal strengths and weaknesses but also the way in which the environment appears to stimulate or block these;the different domains of development; the experienced goodness-of-fit and “t” trauma. Particpants learn how to use the tool to guide their clients or students toward growth, self-actualization, and wisdom.

_PSYCHOLOGISTS, asynchrony, goodnessoffit, ttrauma